Next Article in Journal
Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Favolaschia calocera Complex (Mycenaceae) with Descriptions of Four New Species
Previous Article in Journal
Socioeconomic Impact of Mining in the Atiwa Forest Reserve of Ghana on Fringe Communities and the Achievement of SDGs: Analysis from the Residents’ Perspective
Previous Article in Special Issue
Beavers, Bugs and Chemistry: A Mammalian Herbivore Changes Chemistry Composition and Arthropod Communities in Foundation Tree Species
Article

Seedling Response to Simulated Browsing and Reduced Water Availability: Insights for Assisted Migration Plantations

1
Département de Biologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Direction de la Recherche Forestière, Ministère des Forêts, de la Faune et des Parcs, Québec, QC G1P 3W8, Canada
3
Centre D’étude de la Forêt (CEF), Faculté de Foresterie, de Géographie et de Géomatique, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Julianne O’Reilly-Wapstra, Ben Moore and Timothy A. Martin
Forests 2021, 12(10), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12101396
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 15 September 2021 / Accepted: 3 October 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
To facilitate forest transition to future climate conditions, managers can use adaptive silvicultural tools, for example the assisted translocation of tree species and genotypes to areas with suitable future climate conditions (i.e., assisted migration). Like traditional plantations, however, assisted migration plantations are at risk of failure because of browsing by ungulate herbivores. The ability of seedlings to tolerate browsing could also be hampered by low water availability, as is expected under climate change. Using a greenhouse experiment with five eastern North American tree species, we evaluated the effects of simulated winter browsing and reduced water availability on the growth (total biomass, shoot:root ratio), survival, and chemical composition (nitrogen, total phenolics, flavonoids) of seedlings. We compared seedlings from three geographic provenances representing three climate analogues, i.e., locations with a current climate similar to the climate predicted at the plantation site at a specific time (here: current, mid-century and end of the century). We hypothesized that seedlings would allocate resources to the system (shoots or roots) affected by the most limiting treatment (simulated browsing or reduced water availability). Additionally, we evaluated whether the combination of treatments would have an additive or non-additive effect on the growth, survival and chemical composition of the seedlings. Quercus rubra seedlings reacted only to the water reduction treatment (changes in biomass and N concentration, dependent on geographic provenance) while Pinus strobus reacted only to the simulated browsing treatment (biomass and chemical composition). We also observed non-additive effects of reduced water availability and simulated browsing on Prunus serotina, Acer saccharum and Thuja occidentalis. In general, shoot:root ratio and investment in chemical defense did not vary in response to treatments. The regrowth response observed in Q. rubra and A. saccharum suggests that these species could tolerate periodic browsing events, even when water availability is reduced. More information is required to understand their long-term tolerance to repeated browsing events and to harsher and more frequent water stress. We highlight the importance of species-specific growth and allocation responses that vary with geographic provenance, which should be considered by managers when planning climate-adapted strategies, such as assisted migration. View Full-Text
Keywords: assisted translocation; Cervids; compensatory growth; greenhouse experiment; simulated browsing; tolerance; water stress assisted translocation; Cervids; compensatory growth; greenhouse experiment; simulated browsing; tolerance; water stress
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Champagne, E.; Turgeon, R.; Munson, A.D.; Raymond, P. Seedling Response to Simulated Browsing and Reduced Water Availability: Insights for Assisted Migration Plantations. Forests 2021, 12, 1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12101396

AMA Style

Champagne E, Turgeon R, Munson AD, Raymond P. Seedling Response to Simulated Browsing and Reduced Water Availability: Insights for Assisted Migration Plantations. Forests. 2021; 12(10):1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12101396

Chicago/Turabian Style

Champagne, Emilie, Roxanne Turgeon, Alison D. Munson, and Patricia Raymond. 2021. "Seedling Response to Simulated Browsing and Reduced Water Availability: Insights for Assisted Migration Plantations" Forests 12, no. 10: 1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12101396

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop