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Open AccessArticle

Residual Effects Caused by a Past Mycovirus Infection in Fusarium circinatum

1
Sustainable Forest Management Research Institute, University of Valladolid—INIA, 34004 Palencia, Spain
2
Department of Vegetal Production and Forest Resources, University of Valladolid, 34004 Palencia, Spain
3
Department of Biochemistry, Genetics and Microbiology, Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2021, 12(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010011
Received: 8 October 2020 / Revised: 13 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 24 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological and Bio-Based Management of Forest Pests and Pathogens)
Mycoviruses are known to be difficult to cure in fungi but their spontaneous loss occurs commonly. The unexpected disappearance of mycoviruses can be explained by diverse reasons, from methodological procedures to biological events such as posttranscriptional silencing machinery. The long-term effects of a virus infection on the host organism have been well studied in the case of human viruses; however, the possible residual effect on a fungus after the degradation of a mycovirus is unknown. For that, this study analyses a possible residual effect on the transcriptome of the pathogenic fungus Fusarium circinatum after the loss of the mitovirus FcMV1. The mycovirus that previously infected the fungal isolate was not recovered after a 4-year storage period. Only 14 genes were determined as differentially expressed and were related to cell cycle regulation and amino acid metabolism. The results showed a slight acceleration in the metabolism of the host that had lost the mycovirus by the upregulation of the genes involved in essential functions for fungal development. The analysis also revealed a weak expression in the annotated genes of the RNA silencing machinery. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a potential residual effect on the host transcriptome caused by the past infection of a mycovirus is reported. View Full-Text
Keywords: pine pitch canker disease; RNA-Seq; mitoviruses; transcriptome; differentially expressed genes pine pitch canker disease; RNA-Seq; mitoviruses; transcriptome; differentially expressed genes
MDPI and ACS Style

Zamora-Ballesteros, C.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.; Martín-García, J.; Diez, J.J. Residual Effects Caused by a Past Mycovirus Infection in Fusarium circinatum. Forests 2021, 12, 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010011

AMA Style

Zamora-Ballesteros C, Wingfield BD, Wingfield MJ, Martín-García J, Diez JJ. Residual Effects Caused by a Past Mycovirus Infection in Fusarium circinatum. Forests. 2021; 12(1):11. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zamora-Ballesteros, Cristina; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Martín-García, Jorge; Diez, Julio J. 2021. "Residual Effects Caused by a Past Mycovirus Infection in Fusarium circinatum" Forests 12, no. 1: 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/f12010011

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