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Article

Investigating the Optimal Location of Potential Forest Industry Clusters to Enhance Domestic Timber Utilization in South Korea

1
School of Forest Science and Landscape Architecture, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea
2
Department of Forest Policy and Economics, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul 02445, Korea
3
Chungnam Forest Environment Research Institute, 110 Sanrimbakmulgwan-gil, Geumnam-Myeon, Sejong Special Self-Governing City 30085, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(9), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090936
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 22 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
South Korea has abundant forest resources capable of supplying the domestic wood demand. Despite the extensive forest resources, there is continued uncertainty about the nature, quantity, and quality of the timber contained in any particular forested area. Additionally, some technical, logistic, and economic challenges act as barriers to the expansion of domestic timber utilization. To overcome these limitations and to enhance the domestic timber utilization in South Korea, this study investigated the optimal location of potential forest industry clusters. The potential forest availability was estimated based on localized allometric equations. The integration of the analytical hierarchy process and GIS modeling, including a supply chain that minimizes transportation costs, allowed the identification of optimal forest industry clusters locations that balanced the economic, environmental, and social dimensions within the forest industry supply chain. The study reveals that the estimated potential forest resources availability presented approximately 1 billion m3, including sawlog (474 million m3) and pulpwood grade (541 million m3). Additionally, 45 percent of the sawlogs and 48 percent of the pup grade wood were produced from the Gangwon and Gyeongsangbuk-do regions. Furthermore, the logistic analysis indicates that ten potential forest industry clusters are best aligned with the optimal socio-economic impacts with minimized timber transportation costs. To identify the optimal size and number of potential forest industry clusters, further studies that consider fixed and variable costs for maintaining the forest industry clusters are required. View Full-Text
Keywords: forest industry clusters; optimal location; forest supply chain; domestic timber utilization; forest biomass forest industry clusters; optimal location; forest supply chain; domestic timber utilization; forest biomass
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MDPI and ACS Style

Woo, H.; Han, H.; Cho, S.; Jung, G.; Kim, B.; Ryu, J.; Won, H.K.; Park, J. Investigating the Optimal Location of Potential Forest Industry Clusters to Enhance Domestic Timber Utilization in South Korea. Forests 2020, 11, 936. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090936

AMA Style

Woo H, Han H, Cho S, Jung G, Kim B, Ryu J, Won HK, Park J. Investigating the Optimal Location of Potential Forest Industry Clusters to Enhance Domestic Timber Utilization in South Korea. Forests. 2020; 11(9):936. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090936

Chicago/Turabian Style

Woo, Heesung, Hee Han, Seungwan Cho, Geonhwi Jung, Bomi Kim, Jiyeon Ryu, Hyun K. Won, and Joowon Park. 2020. "Investigating the Optimal Location of Potential Forest Industry Clusters to Enhance Domestic Timber Utilization in South Korea" Forests 11, no. 9: 936. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11090936

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