Next Article in Journal
Oak Taproot Growth Disruption Differentially Impacts Root Architecture during Nursery Production
Next Article in Special Issue
Biogeographic Changes in Forest Soil Microbial Communities of Offshore Islands—A Case Study of Remote Islands in Taiwan
Previous Article in Journal
Preliminary Evidence for Domestication Effects on the Genetic Diversity of Guazuma crinita in the Peruvian Amazon
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Use of Wood Chips for Revitalization of Degraded Forest Soil on Young Scots Pine Plantation
Article

An Assessment of Soil’s Nutrient Deficiencies and Their Influence on the Restoration of Degraded Karst Vegetation in Southwest China

1
Institute of Desertification Studies, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China
2
State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
3
School of Energy, Construction and Environment & Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB, UK
4
Jianshui Research Station, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(8), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11080797
Received: 11 June 2020 / Revised: 16 July 2020 / Accepted: 21 July 2020 / Published: 23 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restoring Forest Landscapes: Impact on Soil Properties and Functions)
The distribution of karst landscapes over the Earth’s surface, to a large extent, follows the distribution of carbonate (limestone and dolomite) and gypsum rocks and together these make up about 12% of the Earth’s land area, and the largest karst region in to world is in Southwestern China. Characterized by a unique set of landforms, these geographical areas also differ from other geomorphic regions by the presence of cave systems in the subsurface. Unfortunately, due to human disturbances, such as deforestation, agricultural expansion, livestock overgrazing and fire, these regions have been affected by varying degrees of degradation, which could also be worsened if water and soil erosion phenomena typical of these areas are considered. Therefore, there is a need to implement measures and strategies to protect these karst areas and develop plans to restore vegetation in this region. To support local and national authorities to achieve this goal, this study aims to characterize nutrient deficiencies in degraded areas and estimate what could be the thresholds required to facilitate the restoration of vegetation in karst areas in southwest China. The results obtained confirm that the total element concentrations for Soil Organic Carbon (SOC), N, K, Ca, P, S and Mg were relatively high in the study karst area in southwest China. However, the total amounts of soil nutrients stored were very low due to the limited amount of soil identified as a consequence of previous deforestation processes undertaken within this study area and this aspect needs to be taken into consideration if aiming at a positive success of future restoration processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: karst ecosystem; karst rocky desertification; nutrient concentration; nutrient limitation; soil loss; vegetation restoration karst ecosystem; karst rocky desertification; nutrient concentration; nutrient limitation; soil loss; vegetation restoration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, Y.; Liu, C.; Rubinato, M.; Guo, K.; Zhou, J.; Cui, M. An Assessment of Soil’s Nutrient Deficiencies and Their Influence on the Restoration of Degraded Karst Vegetation in Southwest China. Forests 2020, 11, 797. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11080797

AMA Style

Liu Y, Liu C, Rubinato M, Guo K, Zhou J, Cui M. An Assessment of Soil’s Nutrient Deficiencies and Their Influence on the Restoration of Degraded Karst Vegetation in Southwest China. Forests. 2020; 11(8):797. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11080797

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Yuguo, Changcheng Liu, Matteo Rubinato, Ke Guo, Jinxing Zhou, and Ming Cui. 2020. "An Assessment of Soil’s Nutrient Deficiencies and Their Influence on the Restoration of Degraded Karst Vegetation in Southwest China" Forests 11, no. 8: 797. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11080797

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop