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Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Eutypella parasitica on the Wood Decay of Three Maple Species

1
Department of Forest Protection, Slovenian Forestry Institute, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2
Department of Forestry and Renewable Forest Resources, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
3
Department of Wood Science and Technology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
4
Department of Forest Yield and Silviculture, Slovenian Forestry Institute, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(6), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060671
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 8 June 2020 / Accepted: 10 June 2020 / Published: 12 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wood Decay Fungi)
Eutypella parasitica R.W. Davidson & R.C. Lorenz is the causative agent of Eutypella canker of maple, a destructive disease of maples in Europe and North America. The fungus E. parasitica is known to cause wood stain and decay. However, it is not known how effectively it decomposes the wood of the most widespread maple species in Europe. Wood samples of Acer pseudoplatanus L., A. platanoides L., and A. campestre L. were exposed to four isolates of E. parasitica and nine other fungal species for comparison, according to the modified EN 113 standard. After 15 weeks of incubation, mass loss and microscopical analysis of samples showed evidence of colonization and different wood decay potentials among fungal species. A highly significant positive correlation was found between mass loss and moisture content for all fungal species. Similarly, the measured cell wall thickness correlated well with the calculated mass loss of the samples. On average, the fungal species caused the lowest mass loss in A. pseudoplatanus (10.0%) and the highest in A. campestre (12.6%) samples. Among the samples exposed to E. parasitica isolates, the highest mass loss was recorded in A. pseudoplatanus (6.6%). Statistical analysis showed significant differences in mass loss and moisture content between different E. parasitica isolates. Based on the results of staining, we discuss the type of decay caused by E. parasitica. Although E. parasitica isolates caused smaller mass loss of samples compared to other more effective decay species, we should not disregard its capability of degrading maple wood. Because E. parasitica usually infects the lower portion of the trunk, which is the largest and most valuable part of the tree, any damage can cause significant economic and resource loss. View Full-Text
Keywords: wood decay; mass loss; moisture content; mini-block test; decay test; Acer spp.; Eutypella parasitica; fungi; light microscopy; scanning electron microscopy wood decay; mass loss; moisture content; mini-block test; decay test; Acer spp.; Eutypella parasitica; fungi; light microscopy; scanning electron microscopy
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Brglez, A.; Piškur, B.; Humar, M.; Gričar, J.; Ogris, N. The Effect of Eutypella parasitica on the Wood Decay of Three Maple Species. Forests 2020, 11, 671.

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