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Article

Influence of Timber Harvesting Operations and Streamside Management Zone Effectiveness on Sediment Delivery to Headwater Streams in Appalachia

1
Coalition for the Poudre River Watershed, 320 E. Vine Drive, Suite 121, Fort Collins, CO 80524, USA
2
Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Kentucky, 218 T.P. Cooper Bldg, Lexington, KY 40546, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(6), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060623
Received: 5 May 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 28 May 2020 / Published: 1 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
Disturbances created by timber harvesting equipment and associated haul roads and skid trails can create overland sediment flows (sediment paths), especially in steeply sloping terrain, leading to stream sedimentation. This study investigated the effect of variables associated with GPS tracked harvest equipment movement, skid trail development and retirement, topography, and streamside management zone (SMZ) width and tree retention on sediment delivery to streams. While the intensity of harvest equipment traffic was not correlated with sediment path development, the presence and location of skid trails were. All of the sediment paths were found to originate at water control structures, influenced by microtopographic features, on the skid trails directly adjacent to SMZs. Mesic slopes were associated with increased sediment path development across all SMZ configurations. Two factors, the accumulation of coarse logging debris in the SMZ and the increased distance of skid trails to streams, were both correlated with decreased sediment path development. The study provides insight into how these variables interact and can be used to develop site-specific guidelines for SMZs in steeply sloping terrain that could improve their efficiency and effectiveness. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedimentation; logging; best management practices; global positioning system sedimentation; logging; best management practices; global positioning system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bowker, D.; Stringer, J.; Barton, C. Influence of Timber Harvesting Operations and Streamside Management Zone Effectiveness on Sediment Delivery to Headwater Streams in Appalachia. Forests 2020, 11, 623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060623

AMA Style

Bowker D, Stringer J, Barton C. Influence of Timber Harvesting Operations and Streamside Management Zone Effectiveness on Sediment Delivery to Headwater Streams in Appalachia. Forests. 2020; 11(6):623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060623

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bowker, Daniel, Jeffrey Stringer, and Christopher Barton. 2020. "Influence of Timber Harvesting Operations and Streamside Management Zone Effectiveness on Sediment Delivery to Headwater Streams in Appalachia" Forests 11, no. 6: 623. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11060623

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