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Genome-Wide Identification of Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter (ALMT) Gene Family in Rubber Trees (Hevea brasiliensis) Highlights Their Involvement in Aluminum Detoxification

1
College of Tropical Crops, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, Hainan, China
2
Danzhou Investigation & Experiment Station of Tropical Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Rubber Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou 571737, Hainan, China
3
Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetic Resources of Tropical Crops, Ministry of Agriculture, Institute of Tropical Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, No. 4 Xueyuan Road, Haikou 571101, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(2), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020142
Received: 16 January 2020 / Accepted: 23 January 2020 / Published: 25 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecophysiology and Biology)
The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is a widely cultivated crop in tropical acidic soil that is tolerant to high concentration of aluminum and the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) plays an important role in plant aluminum detoxification. However, the effects of ALMT on rubber tree aluminum tolerance, growth performance, and latex production are unclear. In this study, 17 HbALMT genes were identified from the genome of rubber trees. The physiological and biochemical characteristics, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, conserved motifs, cis-elements of promoter, and expression patterns of the identified HbALMT genes were studied. Phylogenetic relationships indicated that these genes were divided into four clusters and genes in the same cluster have similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The promoters of HbALMT genes contain many cis-elements associated with biotic stress and abiotic stress. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed HbALMTs showed various expression patterns in different tissues, indicating the functional diversity of HbALMT genes in different tissues of rubber trees. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR assay showed that most of the HbALMT genes responded to aluminum stress, and among the 17 HbALMTs, HbALMT1, HbALMT2, HbALMT13, and HbALMT15 displayed higher expression levels in roots after two or five days of Al treatments, indicating their potential involvement in aluminum detoxification. Taken together, this study laid a foundation for further understanding the molecular evolution of the ALMT genes and their involvement in rubber tree aluminum adaption. View Full-Text
Keywords: aluminum stress; rubber tree; ALMT; organic acid; gene expression aluminum stress; rubber tree; ALMT; organic acid; gene expression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ma, X.; An, F.; Wang, L.; Guo, D.; Xie, G.; Liu, Z. Genome-Wide Identification of Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter (ALMT) Gene Family in Rubber Trees (Hevea brasiliensis) Highlights Their Involvement in Aluminum Detoxification. Forests 2020, 11, 142. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020142

AMA Style

Ma X, An F, Wang L, Guo D, Xie G, Liu Z. Genome-Wide Identification of Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter (ALMT) Gene Family in Rubber Trees (Hevea brasiliensis) Highlights Their Involvement in Aluminum Detoxification. Forests. 2020; 11(2):142. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020142

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ma, Xiaowei; An, Feng; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Dong; Xie, Guishui; Liu, Zifan. 2020. "Genome-Wide Identification of Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter (ALMT) Gene Family in Rubber Trees (Hevea brasiliensis) Highlights Their Involvement in Aluminum Detoxification" Forests 11, no. 2: 142. https://doi.org/10.3390/f11020142

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