Next Article in Journal
Diversity of Phytophthora Species Associated with Quercus ilex L. in Three Spanish Regions Evaluated by NGS
Previous Article in Journal
How Long Do Wood Parenchyma Cells Live in the Stem of a Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)? Studies on Cell Nuclei Status along the Radial and Longitudinal Stem Axes
Open AccessArticle

Dominant Tree Species Shape Soil Microbial Community via Regulating Assembly Processes in Planted Subtropical Forests

1
Research Institute of Tropical Forestry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Longdong, Guangzhou 510520, China
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(11), 978; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110978
Received: 21 September 2019 / Revised: 25 October 2019 / Accepted: 1 November 2019 / Published: 4 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
Understanding the ecological processes that regulate microbial community assembly in different habitats is critical to predict microbial responses to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental changes. Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) and Eucalypt (Eucalyptus urophylla) plantations (thereafter RP and EP) are rapidly established at the expense of forests in tropical China, greatly affecting tropical soils and their processes. However, the assembly processes of soil microbial communities after forest conversions remain unclear. We investigated soil microbial communities’ attributes and quantified the portion of deterministic assembly variation in two RP (a 3- and a 5-year-old) and two EP (a 2- and a 4-year-old) in Southern China. Shannon and Faith’s Phylogenetic α-diversity of both bacterial and fungal communities were higher in RP than in EP, regardless of plantation age or soil depth (0–50 cm). Bacterial and fungal community structure was significantly different among the four plantations. The dominant microbial taxa in RP closely tracked the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (K) while those in EP were closely related to the high total K content. Microbial co-occurrence networks in RP were more modular than those in EP, as governed by more keystone taxa that were strongly dependent on soil available nutrients. Environmental filtering imposed by soil nutrients heterogeneity contributed a considerable portion (33–47%) of bacterial assembly variation in RP, but much less (8–14%) in EP. The relative contribution of environmental selection on fungal assembly was also greater in RP than in EP. Our findings suggest that in RP clear microbial community patterns exist with respect to soil nutrients, whereas in EP microbial community assembly patterns are more stochastic and variable. The large variation in soil microbial community assembly patterns in EP could lead to fragile and unstable microbial-soil relationships, which may be one factor driving soil degradation in EP.
Keywords: soil microbial communities; ecological assembly processes; land use change; Rubber plantation; Eucalypt plantation soil microbial communities; ecological assembly processes; land use change; Rubber plantation; Eucalypt plantation
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Ma, H.; Zou, W.; Yang, J.; Hogan, J.A.; Xu, H.; Chen, J. Dominant Tree Species Shape Soil Microbial Community via Regulating Assembly Processes in Planted Subtropical Forests. Forests 2019, 10, 978.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop