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Open AccessArticle

An Analysis of Common Forest Management Practices for Carbon Sequestration in South Carolina

1
Department of Forestry and Environmental Conservation, Clemson University, 261 Lehotsky Hall Box 340317, Clemson, SC 29634, USA
2
Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology and Forest Science, Clemson University, P. O. Box 596, Georgetown, SC 29442, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(11), 949; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10110949
Received: 7 August 2019 / Revised: 21 October 2019 / Accepted: 24 October 2019 / Published: 25 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
South Carolina (SC) has a variety of different forest types, and they all have potential to sequester a certain amount of carbon. Private forest landowners control a significant portion of the overall forestland in SC, and their management efforts can maintain or improve forest carbon stocks. Currently, the second largest carbon market in the world is the California Carbon Market, which gives a monetary value to sequestered carbon. One carbon credit is equal to one metric ton of carbon and is currently worth around $15.00. Forest management plans are geared toward increasing carbon sequestration over time. This study aims to educate forest landowners about various forest management practices that contribute to increasing carbon stocks by looking at various forest types and locations in SC and their current and projected carbon stocks. Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) data were utilized in the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) to project carbon sequestration for 100 years for 130 plots. A variety of management practices were employed to see the variance in carbon sequestration. Results showed that carbon sequestration would increase for certain management practices such as thinning and prescribed fire. Clear cutting over time was harmful to sequestration. This data will be beneficial for forest landowners interested in a carbon project and those interested in seeing how different management practices affect carbon sequestration. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon markets; forest management; carbon stocks; Forest Inventory Analysis carbon markets; forest management; carbon stocks; Forest Inventory Analysis
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Clay, L.; Motallebi, M.; Song, B. An Analysis of Common Forest Management Practices for Carbon Sequestration in South Carolina. Forests 2019, 10, 949.

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