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Article

Necromass Carbon Stock in a Secondary Atlantic Forest Fragment in Brazil

1
Department of Forest Engineering, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, 36.570-900 Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil
2
Department of Forest Engineering, Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, 44.380-000 Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil
3
Department of Entomology/BIOAGRO, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, 36.570-900 Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(10), 833; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100833
Received: 16 July 2019 / Revised: 17 September 2019 / Accepted: 19 September 2019 / Published: 21 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Carbon Inventories and Management)
Necromass has a relevant role to play in the carbon stock of forest ecosystems, especially with the increase of tree mortality due to climate change. Despite this importance, its quantification is often neglected in tropical forests. The objective of this study was to quantify the carbon storage in a secondary Atlantic Forest fragment in Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Coarse Woody Debris (CWD), standing dead trees (snags), and litter were quantified in twenty 10 m x 50 m plots randomly positioned throughout the forest area (simple random sampling). Data were collected during 2015, from July to December. The CWD and snags volumes were determined by the Smalian method and by allometric equations, respectively. The necromass of these components was estimated by multiplying the volume by the apparent density at each decomposition classes. The litter necromass was estimated by the proportionality method and the average of the extrapolated estimates per hectare. The carbon stock of the three components was quantified by multiplying the necromass and the carbon wood content. The total volume of dead wood, including CWD and snag, was 23.6 ± 0.9 m3 ha−1, being produced mainly by the competition for resources, senescence, and anthropic and climatic disturbances. The total necromass was 16.3 ± 0.4 Mg ha−1. The total carbon stock in necromass was 7.3 ± 0.2 MgC ha−1. The CWD, snag and litter stocked 3.0 ± 0.1, 1.8 ± 0.1, and 2.5 ± 0.1 MgC ha−1, respectively. These results demonstrate that although necromass has a lower carbon stock compared to biomass, neglecting its quantification may lead to underestimation of the carbon balance of forest ecosystems and their potential to mitigate climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; coarse woody debris; litter; rainforest; snags; dead organic matter climate change; coarse woody debris; litter; rainforest; snags; dead organic matter
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MDPI and ACS Style

Villanova, P.H.; Torres, C.M.M.E.; Jacovine, L.A.G.; Soares, C.P.B.; da Silva, L.F.; Schettini, B.L.S.; da Rocha, S.J.S.S.; Zanuncio, J.C. Necromass Carbon Stock in a Secondary Atlantic Forest Fragment in Brazil. Forests 2019, 10, 833. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100833

AMA Style

Villanova PH, Torres CMME, Jacovine LAG, Soares CPB, da Silva LF, Schettini BLS, da Rocha SJSS, Zanuncio JC. Necromass Carbon Stock in a Secondary Atlantic Forest Fragment in Brazil. Forests. 2019; 10(10):833. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100833

Chicago/Turabian Style

Villanova, Paulo H., Carlos M.M.E. Torres, Laércio A.G. Jacovine, Carlos P.B. Soares, Liniker F. da Silva, Bruno L.S. Schettini, Samuel J.S.S. da Rocha, and José C. Zanuncio 2019. "Necromass Carbon Stock in a Secondary Atlantic Forest Fragment in Brazil" Forests 10, no. 10: 833. https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100833

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