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Advanced Estimation of Compressive Strength and Fracture Behavior in Ceramic Honeycombs by Polarimetry Measurements of Similar Epoxy Resin Honeycombs

1
Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Glass and Ceramics), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany
2
Sciences and Technologies Faculty of Limoges, 87060 Limoges, France
3
Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: A. Javier Sanchez-Herencia
Materials 2022, 15(7), 2361; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072361
Received: 28 February 2022 / Revised: 14 March 2022 / Accepted: 17 March 2022 / Published: 22 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Advanced Materials Characterization)
Finding a non-destructive characterization method for cellular ceramics’ compressive strength and fracture behavior has been a challenge for material scientists for years. However, for transparent materials, internal stresses can be determined by the non-destructive photoelastic measurements. We propose a novel approach to correlate the photoelastic stresses of polymer (epoxy resin) prototypes with the mechanical properties of ceramics (alumina). Regular and inverse epoxy honeycombs were 3D-printed via stereolithography with varying structure angles from −35° to 35°, with negative angles forming an auxetic and positive hexagonal lattice. Photoelastic measurements under mechanical loading revealed regions of excess stress, which directly corresponded to the initial fracture points of the ceramic honeycombs. These honeycombs were made by a combination of 3D printing and transfer molding from alumina. The photoelastic stress distribution was much more homogeneous for angles of a smaller magnitude, which led to highly increased compressive strengths of up to 446 ± 156 MPa at 0°. By adapting the geometric structural model from Gibson and Ashby, we showed that we could use a non-destructive technique to determine the compressive strength of alumina honeycombs from the median photoelastic stress measured on similar epoxy honeycomb structures. View Full-Text
Keywords: auxetic honeycombs; polarimetry; digital image correlation; ceramic transfer molding; stress prediction auxetic honeycombs; polarimetry; digital image correlation; ceramic transfer molding; stress prediction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Köllner, D.; Tolve-Granier, B.; Simon, S.; Kakimoto, K.-i.; Fey, T. Advanced Estimation of Compressive Strength and Fracture Behavior in Ceramic Honeycombs by Polarimetry Measurements of Similar Epoxy Resin Honeycombs. Materials 2022, 15, 2361. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072361

AMA Style

Köllner D, Tolve-Granier B, Simon S, Kakimoto K-i, Fey T. Advanced Estimation of Compressive Strength and Fracture Behavior in Ceramic Honeycombs by Polarimetry Measurements of Similar Epoxy Resin Honeycombs. Materials. 2022; 15(7):2361. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072361

Chicago/Turabian Style

Köllner, David, Bastien Tolve-Granier, Swantje Simon, Ken-ichi Kakimoto, and Tobias Fey. 2022. "Advanced Estimation of Compressive Strength and Fracture Behavior in Ceramic Honeycombs by Polarimetry Measurements of Similar Epoxy Resin Honeycombs" Materials 15, no. 7: 2361. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15072361

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