Next Article in Journal
Characterization of a Sandwich PLGA-Gallic Acid-PLGA Coating on Mg Alloy ZK60 for Bioresorbable Coronary Artery Stents
Next Article in Special Issue
Residual Stresses Measurements in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Using Barkhausen Noise Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Use of Maraging Steel 1.2709 for Implementing Parts of Pressure Mold Devices with Conformal Cooling System
 
 
Article

316L Stainless Steel Powders for Additive Manufacturing: Relationships of Powder Rheology, Size, Size Distribution to Part Properties

1
Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, 9 Dublin, Ireland
2
I-Form Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Collins Avenue, 9 Dublin, Ireland
3
South East Applied Materials (SEAM) Research Centre, Applied Technology Building, Waterford Institute of Technology, X91 TX03 Waterford, Ireland
4
Particular Sciences, 2 Birch House, Rosemount Business Park, Ballycoolin Road, 11 T327 Dublin, Ireland
5
Castolin Eutectic, Magna Business Park, 36 Magna Avenue, Citywest, 24 Dublin, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(23), 5537; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235537
Received: 14 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 28 November 2020 / Published: 4 December 2020
Laser-Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) of metallic parts is a highly multivariate process. An understanding of powder feedstock properties is critical to ensure part quality. In this paper, a detailed examination of two commercial stainless steel 316L powders produced using the gas atomization process is presented. In particular, the effects of the powder properties (particle size and shape) on the powder rheology were examined. The results presented suggest that the powder properties strongly influence the powder rheology and are important factors in the selection of suitable powder for use in an additive manufacturing (AM) process. Both of the powders exhibited a strong correlation between the particle size and shape parameters and the powder rheology. Optical microscope images of melt pools of parts printed using the powders in an L-PBF machine are presented, which demonstrated further the significance of the powder morphology parameters on resulting part microstructures. View Full-Text
Keywords: metal additive manufacturing; powder bed fusion; powder rheology; microstructure; Stainless Steel 316L metal additive manufacturing; powder bed fusion; powder rheology; microstructure; Stainless Steel 316L
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Groarke, R.; Danilenkoff, C.; Karam, S.; McCarthy, E.; Michel, B.; Mussatto, A.; Sloane, J.; O’ Neill, A.; Raghavendra, R.; Brabazon, D. 316L Stainless Steel Powders for Additive Manufacturing: Relationships of Powder Rheology, Size, Size Distribution to Part Properties. Materials 2020, 13, 5537. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235537

AMA Style

Groarke R, Danilenkoff C, Karam S, McCarthy E, Michel B, Mussatto A, Sloane J, O’ Neill A, Raghavendra R, Brabazon D. 316L Stainless Steel Powders for Additive Manufacturing: Relationships of Powder Rheology, Size, Size Distribution to Part Properties. Materials. 2020; 13(23):5537. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235537

Chicago/Turabian Style

Groarke, Robert, Cyril Danilenkoff, Sara Karam, Eanna McCarthy, Bastien Michel, Andre Mussatto, John Sloane, Aidan O’ Neill, Ramesh Raghavendra, and Dermot Brabazon. 2020. "316L Stainless Steel Powders for Additive Manufacturing: Relationships of Powder Rheology, Size, Size Distribution to Part Properties" Materials 13, no. 23: 5537. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235537

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop