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Review

Role of Stimuli on Liquid Crystalline Defects: From Defect Engineering to Switchable Functional Materials

by 1 and 1,2,3,*
1
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea
2
Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, Korea
3
KAIST Institute for Nanocentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 34141, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2020, 13(23), 5466; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235466
Received: 12 November 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 27 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli Responsive Liquid Crystals)
Achieving tunable physical properties is currently one of the most exciting research topics. In order to realize this goal, a medium that is responsive to external stimuli and can undergo a change in its physical property is required. Liquid crystal (LC) is a prominent candidate, as its physical and optical properties can be easily manipulated with various stimuli, such as surface anchoring, rubbing, geometric confinement, and external fields. Having broken away from the past devotion to obtaining a uniform domain of LCs, people are now putting significant efforts toward forming and manipulating ordered and oriented defect structures with a unique arrangement within. The complicated molecular order with tunability would benefit the interdisciplinary research fields of optics, physics, photonics, and materials science. In this review, the recent progress toward defect engineering in the nematic and smectic phases by controlling the surface environment and electric field and their combinational methods is introduced. We close the review with a discussion of the possible applications enabled using LC defect structures as switchable materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: liquid crystals; interface; surface treatment; rubbing; geometric confinement; electric field application liquid crystals; interface; surface treatment; rubbing; geometric confinement; electric field application
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shin, M.J.; Yoon, D.K. Role of Stimuli on Liquid Crystalline Defects: From Defect Engineering to Switchable Functional Materials. Materials 2020, 13, 5466. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235466

AMA Style

Shin MJ, Yoon DK. Role of Stimuli on Liquid Crystalline Defects: From Defect Engineering to Switchable Functional Materials. Materials. 2020; 13(23):5466. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235466

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shin, Min J., and Dong K. Yoon. 2020. "Role of Stimuli on Liquid Crystalline Defects: From Defect Engineering to Switchable Functional Materials" Materials 13, no. 23: 5466. https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235466

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