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Article

The Cost of Failed First-Line Cancer Treatment Related to Continued Smoking in Canada

1
Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON M5H 1J8, Canada
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
3
Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(6), 307-312; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5951
Received: 9 September 2020 / Revised: 8 October 2020 / Accepted: 10 November 2020 / Published: 1 December 2020
Background: Smoking by cancer patients and survivors causes adverse cancer treatment outcomes, but little information is available about how smoking can affect cancer treatment costs. Methods: We developed a model to estimate attributable cancer treatment failure because of continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis (AFs). Canadian health system data were used to determine the additional treatment cost for AFs for the most common cancers in Canada. Results: Of 206,000 patients diagnosed with cancer annually, an estimated 4789 experienced afs. The annual incremental cost associated with treating patients experiencing afs was estimated at between $198 million and $295 million (2017 Canadian dollars), reflecting an added incremental cost of $4,810–$7,162 per patient who continued to smoke. Analyses according to disease site demonstrated higher incremental costs where the smoking prevalence and the cost of individual second-line cancer treatment were highest. Of breast, prostate, colorectal, and lung cancers, lung cancer was associated with the highest incremental cost for treatment after AFs. Conclusions: The costs associated with afs in Canada after a cancer diagnosis are considerable. Populations in which the smoking prevalence and treatment costs are high are expected to benefit the most from efforts aimed at increasing smoking cessation capacity for patients newly diagnosed with cancer.
Keywords: attributable cancer treatment failures; cost burden; smoking cessation attributable cancer treatment failures; cost burden; smoking cessation
MDPI and ACS Style

Iragorri, N.; Essue, B.; Timmings, C.; Keen, D.; Bryant, H.; Warren, G.W. The Cost of Failed First-Line Cancer Treatment Related to Continued Smoking in Canada. Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27, 307-312. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5951

AMA Style

Iragorri N, Essue B, Timmings C, Keen D, Bryant H, Warren GW. The Cost of Failed First-Line Cancer Treatment Related to Continued Smoking in Canada. Current Oncology. 2020; 27(6):307-312. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5951

Chicago/Turabian Style

Iragorri, N., B. Essue, C. Timmings, D. Keen, H. Bryant, and G.W. Warren 2020. "The Cost of Failed First-Line Cancer Treatment Related to Continued Smoking in Canada" Current Oncology 27, no. 6: 307-312. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5951

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