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Article

The Effect of Acetaminophen on Running Economy and Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners

Department of Recreation, Exercise & Sport Science, Western Colorado University, Gunnison, CO 81230, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jooyoung Kim
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2927; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052927
Received: 25 January 2022 / Revised: 23 February 2022 / Accepted: 27 February 2022 / Published: 2 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements for Exercise Performance and Recovery)
Acetaminophen (ACT) may decrease perception of pain during exercise, which could allow runners to improve running economy (RE) and performance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ACT on RE and 3 km time trial (TT) performance in collegiate distance runners. A randomized, double blind, crossover study was employed in which 11 track athletes (9M/2F; age: 18.8 ± 0.6 years; VO2 max: 60.6 ± 7.7 mL/kg/min) completed three intervention sessions. Participants ingested either nothing (baseline, BSL), three gelatin capsules (placebo, PLA), or three 500 mg ACT caplets (ACT). One hour after ingestion, participants completed a graded exercise test consisting of 4 × 5 min steady-state stages at ~55–75% of VO2 max followed by a 3 km TT. There was no influence of ACT on RE in any stage. Similarly, ACT did not favorably modify 3 km TT performance [mean ± SD: BSL = 613 ± 71 s; PLA = 617 ± 70 s; ACT = 618 ± 70 s; p = 0.076]. The results indicate that ACT does not improve RE or TT performance in collegiate runners at the 3 km distance. Those wanting to utilize ACT for performance must understand that ACT’s benefits have yet to be significant amongst well-trained runners. Future studies should examine the effects of ACT on well-trained runners over longer trial distances and under more controlled conditions with appropriate medical oversight. View Full-Text
Keywords: endurance; time trial; perceived exertion; pain reliever endurance; time trial; perceived exertion; pain reliever
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huffman, R.P.; Van Guilder, G.P. The Effect of Acetaminophen on Running Economy and Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 2927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052927

AMA Style

Huffman RP, Van Guilder GP. The Effect of Acetaminophen on Running Economy and Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(5):2927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052927

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huffman, Riley P., and Gary P. Van Guilder. 2022. "The Effect of Acetaminophen on Running Economy and Performance in Collegiate Distance Runners" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 5: 2927. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052927

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