Next Article in Journal
Gender Disparities of Heart Disease and the Association with Smoking and Drinking Behavior among Middle-Aged and Older Adults, a Cross-Sectional Study of Data from the US Health and Retirement Study and the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study
Next Article in Special Issue
The Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Productivity Measurement and Enhancement System Intervention to Reduce Employee Work-Related Stress and Enhance Work Performance
Previous Article in Journal
Gendered Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Food Behaviors in North Africa: Cases of Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Occupational Exposure to Wood Dust and the Burden of Nasopharynx and Sinonasal Cancer in Canada
 
 
Article

Cost Implications from an Employer Perspective of a Workplace Intervention for Carer-Employees during the COVID-19 Pandemic

1
School of Earth Environment and Society, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada
2
Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact (HEI), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Matthew Taylor and Petri Böckerman
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042194
Received: 15 December 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2022 / Accepted: 10 February 2022 / Published: 15 February 2022
In developed countries, population aging due to advances in living standards and healthcare infrastructure means that the care associated with chronic and degenerative diseases is becoming more prevalent across all facets of society—including the labour market. Informal caregiving, that is, care provision performed by friends and family, is expected to increase in the near future in Canada, with implications for workplaces. Absenteeism, presenteeism, work satisfaction and retention are known to be worse in employees who juggle the dual role of caregiving and paid employment, representing losses to workplaces’ bottom line. Recent discourse on addressing the needs of carer-employees (CEs) in the workplace have been centred around carer-friendly workplace policies. This paper aims to assess the potential cost implication of a carer-friendly workplace intervention implemented within a large-sized Canadian workplace. The goal of the intervention was to induce carer-friendly workplace culture change. A workplace-wide survey was circulated twice, prior to and after the intervention, capturing demographic variables, as well as absenteeism, presenteeism, turnover and impact on coworkers. Utilizing the pre-intervention timepoint as a baseline, we employed a cost implication analysis to quantify the immediate impact of the intervention from the employer’s perspective. We found that the intervention overall was not cost-saving, although there were some mixed effects regarding some costs, such as absenteeism. Non-tangible benefits, such as changes to employee morale, satisfaction with supervisor, job satisfaction and work culture, were not monetarily quantified within this analysis; hence, we consider it to be a conservative analysis. View Full-Text
Keywords: carer-employee; intervention; COVID-19; cost savings carer-employee; intervention; COVID-19; cost savings
MDPI and ACS Style

Ding, R.; Gafni, A.; Williams, A. Cost Implications from an Employer Perspective of a Workplace Intervention for Carer-Employees during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 2194. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042194

AMA Style

Ding R, Gafni A, Williams A. Cost Implications from an Employer Perspective of a Workplace Intervention for Carer-Employees during the COVID-19 Pandemic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(4):2194. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042194

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ding, Regina, Amiram Gafni, and Allison Williams. 2022. "Cost Implications from an Employer Perspective of a Workplace Intervention for Carer-Employees during the COVID-19 Pandemic" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 4: 2194. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042194

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop