Next Article in Journal
Factors Associated with Postoperative Rehospitalization in Patients with Cervical Disc Herniation
Next Article in Special Issue
Wellbeing in Workers during COVID-19 Pandemic: The Mediating Role of Self-Compassion in the Relationship between Personal Resources and Exhaustion
Previous Article in Journal
Unpacking Cigar Product Familiarity and Terminology among Black and Hispanic Youth: It’s All about Blunts
Previous Article in Special Issue
“It Is Difficult to Always Be an Antagonist”: Ethical, Professional, and Moral Dilemmas as Potentially Psychologically Traumatic Events among Nurses in Canada
 
 
Review

Occupational Health and Safety Statistics as an Indicator of Worker Physical Health in South African Industry

1
Department of Environmental Health, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2
Occupational Health Division, School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2193, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1690; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031690
Received: 10 December 2021 / Revised: 24 January 2022 / Accepted: 29 January 2022 / Published: 1 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Wellness in the Workplace)
Operations in general industry, including manufacturing, expose employees to a myriad of occupational health hazards. To prevent exposure, occupational health and safety regulations were enacted, with both employers and workers instituting various risk reduction measures. The analysis of available occupational disease and injury statistics (indicators of worker physical health) can be used to infer the effectiveness of risk reduction measures and regulations in preventing exposure. Thus, using the READ approach, analyses of occupational disease and injury statistics from South African industry, derived from annual reports of the Compensation Fund, were conducted. The publicly available database of occupational disease and injury statistics from the South African general industry is unstructured, and the data are inconsistently reported. This data scarcity, symptomatic of an absence of a functional occupational disease surveillance system, complicates judgement making regarding the effectiveness of implemented risk reduction measures, enacted occupational health and safety regulations and the status of worker physical health from exposure to workplace hazards. The statistics, where available, indicate that workers continue to be exposed to occupational health impacts within general industry, notwithstanding risk reduction measures and enacted regulations. In particular, worker physical health continues to be impacted by occupational injuries and noise-induced hearing loss. This is suggestive of shortcomings and inefficiencies in industry-implemented preventive measures and the regulatory state. A robust national occupational disease surveillance system is a regulatory tool that should detect and direct policy responses to identified occupational health hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: compensation; hazard and risk identification; health and safety legislation; health hazard; occupational disease; regulatory inspection; surveillance compensation; hazard and risk identification; health and safety legislation; health hazard; occupational disease; regulatory inspection; surveillance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rikhotso, O.; Morodi, T.J.; Masekameni, D.M. Occupational Health and Safety Statistics as an Indicator of Worker Physical Health in South African Industry. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031690

AMA Style

Rikhotso O, Morodi TJ, Masekameni DM. Occupational Health and Safety Statistics as an Indicator of Worker Physical Health in South African Industry. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031690

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rikhotso, Oscar, Thabiso John Morodi, and Daniel Masilu Masekameni. 2022. "Occupational Health and Safety Statistics as an Indicator of Worker Physical Health in South African Industry" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1690. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031690

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop