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Article

One-Year Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown-Related Factors on Cardiovascular Risk and Mental Health: A Population-Based Cohort Study

1
UMR 1295 CERPOP, INSERM, UPS, Department of Epidemiology, Health Economics and Public Health, Toulouse University Hospital (CHU), University of Toulouse, 31000 Toulouse, France
2
Department of Cardiology, Toulouse University Hospital (CHU), 31000 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1684; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031684
Received: 6 December 2021 / Revised: 30 January 2022 / Accepted: 31 January 2022 / Published: 1 February 2022
Lockdown measures have obvious psychological impacts, which could, in turn, increase cardiovascular risk. We assessed the association between lockdown-related factors and the worsening of cardiovascular risk, incident anxiety and depression during 12 months’ follow-up. During lockdown (April–May 2020), 534 subjects, aged 50–89 years, were included in the PSYCOV-CV study (NCT04397835) and followed for up to 12 months post-lockdown. We found that participants with symptoms of depression during lockdown were more likely to report increased cardiovascular drug treatment (Odds-Ratio (OR) = 5.08 (1.78–14.5), p = 0.002), decreased physical activity (OR = 1.76 (1.10–2.82), p = 0.019) and weight gain (OR = 1.85 (1.08–3.17), p = 0.024) after lockdown. Moreover, changes in sleep patterns (OR = 2.35 (1.13–4.88), p = 0.022) or living in a rural area during lockdown (OR = 1.70 (0.96–3.03, p = 0.069) were associated with higher incident depression, whereas a better relationship with one’s partner during lockdown was associated with less incident depression (OR = 0.56 (0.29–1.08), p = 0.084). Finally, we found that continuing to work during lockdown in a role requiring in-person contact with the public (such as cashiers, nurses or physicians) was associated with more incident anxiety after lockdown (OR = 3.38 (1.12–10.2), p = 0.031). Interestingly, decreased consumption of alcohol during lockdown was associated with less incident anxiety (OR = 0.30 (0.10–0.90), p = 0.032). Our study, conducted in a representative sample of an age group at increased risk of both cardiovascular disease and severe COVID-19, increases the understanding of modifiable factors associated with the health impacts of lockdown measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; lockdown; anxiety; depression; cardiovascular risk; general population; cohort study; 1-year follow-up; middle-aged adults; older adults COVID-19; lockdown; anxiety; depression; cardiovascular risk; general population; cohort study; 1-year follow-up; middle-aged adults; older adults
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bérard, E.; Huo Yung Kai, S.; Coley, N.; Bongard, V.; Ferrières, J. One-Year Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown-Related Factors on Cardiovascular Risk and Mental Health: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1684. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031684

AMA Style

Bérard E, Huo Yung Kai S, Coley N, Bongard V, Ferrières J. One-Year Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown-Related Factors on Cardiovascular Risk and Mental Health: A Population-Based Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1684. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031684

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bérard, Emilie, Samantha Huo Yung Kai, Nicola Coley, Vanina Bongard, and Jean Ferrières. 2022. "One-Year Impact of COVID-19 Lockdown-Related Factors on Cardiovascular Risk and Mental Health: A Population-Based Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1684. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031684

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