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Article

Building Resilient Cities: Climate Change and Health Interlinkages in the Planning of Public Spaces

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Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, 5230 Odense, Denmark
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Department of Planning, Aalborg University, 9000 Aalborg, Denmark
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Càtedra UNESCO de Sostenibilitat, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya—BarcelonaTech, The School of Industrial, Aerospace and Audiovisual Engineering of Terrassa, ESEIAAT, C/Colom, 08222 Terrassa, Spain
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1355; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031355
Received: 20 December 2021 / Revised: 21 January 2022 / Accepted: 24 January 2022 / Published: 26 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Climate Change)
Greenhouse gases emissions resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels are worsening air quality and affecting the climate system. While climate change impacts on meteorological variables affects air quality by altering the concentration and distribution of pollutants, air pollution significantly influences the climate, leading to negative impacts on human health. Due to the combination of high temperatures, air pollution, and high population density, cities are particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts. The planning and design of public spaces aimed at climate change mitigation and adaptation can result in multiple co-benefits for human health, while reducing social inequalities. To address the major research gaps in the communication between health and planning experts, and the lack of capacity among public sectors and policy makers, it is necessary to promote capacity building and knowledge sharing between the planning and health sectors. The purpose of this article is to develop preliminary recommendations for a process that allows a comprehensive assessment of the interlinkages between climate and health, social, environmental, and economic vulnerabilities, and the quality of the urban spaces, to support local governments, policymakers, and education institutions in making informed decisions for public spaces. The methods applied were a literature review and interviews with experts. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; health; city; public space; urban resilience; vulnerability; inequality climate change; health; city; public space; urban resilience; vulnerability; inequality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Orsetti, E.; Tollin, N.; Lehmann, M.; Valderrama, V.A.; Morató, J. Building Resilient Cities: Climate Change and Health Interlinkages in the Planning of Public Spaces. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1355. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031355

AMA Style

Orsetti E, Tollin N, Lehmann M, Valderrama VA, Morató J. Building Resilient Cities: Climate Change and Health Interlinkages in the Planning of Public Spaces. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1355. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031355

Chicago/Turabian Style

Orsetti, Eleonora, Nicola Tollin, Martin Lehmann, Vanessa A. Valderrama, and Jordi Morató. 2022. "Building Resilient Cities: Climate Change and Health Interlinkages in the Planning of Public Spaces" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1355. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031355

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