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Systematic Review

Environmental and Occupational Health Exposures and Outcomes of Informal Street Food Vendors in South Africa: A Quasi-Systematic Review

by 1,* and 1,2,3
1
Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Doornfontein Campus, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2094, South Africa
2
Environment and Health Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Johannesburg 2094, South Africa
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Health Systems and Public Health, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 001, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alesia Ferguson and Timothy W. Collins
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1348; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031348
Received: 10 November 2021 / Revised: 30 December 2021 / Accepted: 20 January 2022 / Published: 25 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Introduction: Informal street vending is a form of informal employment, and occupational conditions for people within this group have been proven to be detrimental to their health. Two independent reviewers carried out a systematic evaluation of the existing literature in South Africa on environmental and occupational exposures, as well as the health effects faced by informal street food vendors. Methods: 354 published publications were reviewed and 9 were included, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: The evidence showed that informal street vendors are exposed to workplace risks that affect their health and wellbeing. Non-enclosed vendor stalls and frequent use of open fires were among the risk concerns. Vendors are vulnerable to gastrointestinal diseases such as salmonellosis and respiratory infections such as influenza and COVID-19 due to inadequate access to water, waste disposal facilities, and basic hygiene awareness and practices. Exposure to air pollutants increased the risk of respiratory and urinary illnesses and an impact on the reproductive health of female street vendors. Conclusions: This investigation demonstrated the difficulties in complying with the requirements of the Regulations Governing General Hygiene Requirements for Food Premises, the Transport of Food, and Related Matters (no. R638 of 22 June 2018) and the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act (no. 85 of 1993). Within South African borders, there is a scarcity of research on occupational exposures and health effects in this occupation. As a result, eliminating or preventing these occupational exposures should be at the top of government and stakeholder agendas. The majority of the research was carried out in KwaZulu Natal and used a quantitative, cross-sectional technique. Other designs, including cohorts, time series, and randomized intervention trials, were underutilized. View Full-Text
Keywords: South Africa; informal; street vendors; environmental health; occupational health South Africa; informal; street vendors; environmental health; occupational health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sepadi, M.M.; Nkosi, V. Environmental and Occupational Health Exposures and Outcomes of Informal Street Food Vendors in South Africa: A Quasi-Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1348. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031348

AMA Style

Sepadi MM, Nkosi V. Environmental and Occupational Health Exposures and Outcomes of Informal Street Food Vendors in South Africa: A Quasi-Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1348. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031348

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sepadi, Maasago Mercy, and Vusumuzi Nkosi. 2022. "Environmental and Occupational Health Exposures and Outcomes of Informal Street Food Vendors in South Africa: A Quasi-Systematic Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1348. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031348

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