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Screen Time and Body Image in Icelandic Adolescents: Sex-Specific Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations

1
Center of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Iceland, 105 Reykjavik, Iceland
2
Diabetes, Endocrinology and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
3
Department of Sport and Physical Activity, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, 5063 Bergen, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1308; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031308
Received: 25 November 2021 / Revised: 14 January 2022 / Accepted: 20 January 2022 / Published: 24 January 2022
Studies of adolescent body image and screen use are mostly limited to girls, and longitudinal data are scarce. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between these variables in mid-adolescent boys and girls. Data was collected when participants were at age 15 and 17, by questionnaire and objective measurements (n = 152 had complete data). Sex-specific linear regression was used to explore cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of self-reported screen use (total use, and time spent in gaming, TV/DVD/internet-based watching and internet use for communication) and body image, adjusting for vigorous physical activity, symptoms of depression, and body composition. Screen time was negatively associated with body image at both time points, although more strongly at age 15, and for girls only. Gaming and TV/DVD/internet watching was more strongly associated with body image than internet use for communication. Girls with above median screen time at both ages had 14% lower body image score at age 17 than girls with below median screen time at both time points. Our results suggest that screen use is likely to play a role in the development of body dissatisfaction among adolescent females. Limiting screen time may, therefore, help to mitigate body dissatisfaction in adolescent girls. View Full-Text
Keywords: screen time; body image; adolescents; longitudinal association; sex-specific analysis screen time; body image; adolescents; longitudinal association; sex-specific analysis
MDPI and ACS Style

Hrafnkelsdottir, S.M.; Brychta, R.J.; Rognvaldsdottir, V.; Chen, K.Y.; Johannsson, E.; Guðmundsdottir, S.L.; Arngrimsson, S.A. Screen Time and Body Image in Icelandic Adolescents: Sex-Specific Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 1308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031308

AMA Style

Hrafnkelsdottir SM, Brychta RJ, Rognvaldsdottir V, Chen KY, Johannsson E, Guðmundsdottir SL, Arngrimsson SA. Screen Time and Body Image in Icelandic Adolescents: Sex-Specific Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(3):1308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031308

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hrafnkelsdottir, Soffia M., Robert J. Brychta, Vaka Rognvaldsdottir, Kong Y. Chen, Erlingur Johannsson, Sigridur L. Guðmundsdottir, and Sigurbjorn A. Arngrimsson. 2022. "Screen Time and Body Image in Icelandic Adolescents: Sex-Specific Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Associations" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 3: 1308. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031308

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