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Article

Interpersonal Violence in Belgian Sport Today: Young Athletes Report

by 1,2,3,4,5,*, 1, 3,4,5,6, 3,5,7 and 3,5,7
1
Forensic Psychology Research Unit, Thomas More University of Applied Sciences, 2018 Antwerp, Belgium
2
Social Epidemiology and Health Policy, University of Antwerp, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium
3
International Research Network on Violence and Integrity in Sport (IRNOVIS), 2610 Antwerp, Belgium
4
Interdisciplinary Research Center on Intimate Relationship Problems and Sexual Abuse (CRIPCAS), C.P. 6128, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada
5
Research Chair in Security and Integrity in Sport, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
6
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
7
Institute for Health and Sport (IHES), Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 3021, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(18), 11745; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811745
Received: 13 August 2022 / Revised: 8 September 2022 / Accepted: 15 September 2022 / Published: 17 September 2022
Initiatives to safeguard athletes from interpersonal violence (IV) are rapidly growing. In Belgium, knowledge on the magnitude of IV in sport is based on one retrospective prevalence study from 2016 (n = 2.043 adults), involving those who had participated in organized sport for up to 18 years. Data on victimization rates in current youth sport populations are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the magnitude of IV in a sample of 769 athletes (aged between 13 and 21), using the Violence Towards Athletes Questionnaire (VTAQ). All types of IV were prevalent in this sample, ranging from 27% (sexual violence) to 79% (psychological violence and neglect). Boys reported significantly more physical violence, while girls reported significantly more sexual violence. IV perpetrated by peer athletes was reported to the same degree as IV perpetrated by a coach (70%), while IV perpetrated by a parent in the context of sport was somewhat less common, but still prevalent (48%). These findings, including factors associated with elevated exposure rates, can serve as a baseline measurement to monitor and evaluate current and future safeguarding interventions in Belgian sport. View Full-Text
Keywords: violence; young athletes; sport; self-report; questionnaire; magnitude violence; young athletes; sport; self-report; questionnaire; magnitude
MDPI and ACS Style

Vertommen, T.; Decuyper, M.; Parent, S.; Pankowiak, A.; Woessner, M.N. Interpersonal Violence in Belgian Sport Today: Young Athletes Report. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 11745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811745

AMA Style

Vertommen T, Decuyper M, Parent S, Pankowiak A, Woessner MN. Interpersonal Violence in Belgian Sport Today: Young Athletes Report. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(18):11745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811745

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vertommen, Tine, Mieke Decuyper, Sylvie Parent, Aurélie Pankowiak, and Mary N. Woessner. 2022. "Interpersonal Violence in Belgian Sport Today: Young Athletes Report" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 18: 11745. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191811745

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