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Article

Outlining the Invisible: Experiences and Perspectives Regarding Concussion Recovery, Return-to-Work, and Resource Gaps

1
British Columbia Injury Research and Prevention Unit, British Columbia Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4H4, Canada
2
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Martina Michaelis, Monika A. Rieger and Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 8204; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138204
Received: 11 May 2022 / Revised: 1 July 2022 / Accepted: 1 July 2022 / Published: 5 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Workplace Health Management)
Appropriate supports and accommodations are necessary to ensure full concussion recovery and return-to-work (RTW). This research investigated barriers and facilitators to concussion recovery and RTW, and resource gaps reported by adults with concussion (‘workers’) and workplace and healthcare professionals (‘workplaces’). Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with workers (n = 31) and workplaces (n = 16) across British Columbia. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Facilitators to workers’ concussion recovery and RTW included treatment, social support, and workplace and lifestyle modifications. To address barriers, both groups recommended: (a) widespread concussion and RTW education and training (b) standardized concussion recovery guidelines; (c) changing attitudes toward concussion; (d) mental health supports; and (e) increasing awareness that every concussion is unique. Findings can inform best practice for concussion recovery and RTW among professionals in workplaces, healthcare, occupational health and safety, and workers’ compensation boards. View Full-Text
Keywords: mild traumatic brain injury; adult; workers; concussion management; concussion recovery; workplace; occupational health mild traumatic brain injury; adult; workers; concussion management; concussion recovery; workplace; occupational health
MDPI and ACS Style

Karmali, S.; Beaton, M.D.; Babul, S. Outlining the Invisible: Experiences and Perspectives Regarding Concussion Recovery, Return-to-Work, and Resource Gaps. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 8204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138204

AMA Style

Karmali S, Beaton MD, Babul S. Outlining the Invisible: Experiences and Perspectives Regarding Concussion Recovery, Return-to-Work, and Resource Gaps. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(13):8204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138204

Chicago/Turabian Style

Karmali, Shazya, Marie Denise Beaton, and Shelina Babul. 2022. "Outlining the Invisible: Experiences and Perspectives Regarding Concussion Recovery, Return-to-Work, and Resource Gaps" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 13: 8204. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19138204

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