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Article

Feeding Practices, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Vaginal Birth after Cesarean and Elective Repeat Cesarean Delivery

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Students’ Scientific Group Affiliated to II Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-091 Warszawa, Poland
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II Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-091 Warszawa, Poland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(13), 7696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137696
Received: 13 April 2022 / Revised: 18 June 2022 / Accepted: 21 June 2022 / Published: 23 June 2022
Cesarean section rates are constantly rising, and the number of women with a prior cesarean considering a delivery mode for their next labor is increasing. We aimed to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes and feeding method in women undergoing vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) versus elective repeat cesarean delivery (ERCD). This was a retrospective cohort study of women with one prior cesarean delivery (CD) and no previous vaginal births, delivering vaginally or by a CD in a single institution between 2016 and 2018. 355 live singleton spontaneous vaginal and cesarean deliveries were included. 121 women delivered vaginally and 234 had a CD. Neonates born by a CD were more likely to have higher birth weight (p < 0.001), higher weight at discharge (p < 0.001), macrosomia (p = 0.030), lose >10% of their body mass (p = 0.001), be mixed-fed (p < 0.001), and be hospitalized longer (p < 0.001). Children born vaginally were more likely to be exclusively breastfed (p < 0.001). Women undergoing VBAC were more likely to deliver preterm (p = 0.006) and post-term (p < 0.001), present with PROM (p < 0.001), have greater PROM latency period (p < 0.001), and experience intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (p = 0.029), postpartum anemia (p < 0.001), and peripartum blood loss >1 L (p = 0.049). The incidence of anemia during pregnancy was higher in the ERCD cohort (p = 0.047). Women undergoing VBAC are more likely to breastfeed their children, perhaps for the same reason they choose the vaginal method of delivery, as vaginal delivery and breastfeeding along with antibiotic use, are the most important factors decreasing the risk for future diseases in their offspring. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; pregnancy outcome; repeat cesarean section; vaginal birth after cesarean; cesarean section; feeding method pregnancy; pregnancy outcome; repeat cesarean section; vaginal birth after cesarean; cesarean section; feeding method
MDPI and ACS Style

Rudzinski, P.; Lopuszynska, I.; Pieniak, K.; Stelmach, D.; Kacperczyk-Bartnik, J.; Romejko-Wolniewicz, E. Feeding Practices, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Vaginal Birth after Cesarean and Elective Repeat Cesarean Delivery. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 7696. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137696

AMA Style

Rudzinski P, Lopuszynska I, Pieniak K, Stelmach D, Kacperczyk-Bartnik J, Romejko-Wolniewicz E. Feeding Practices, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Vaginal Birth after Cesarean and Elective Repeat Cesarean Delivery. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(13):7696. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137696

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rudzinski, Patryk, Inga Lopuszynska, Katarzyna Pieniak, Daria Stelmach, Joanna Kacperczyk-Bartnik, and Ewa Romejko-Wolniewicz. 2022. "Feeding Practices, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Vaginal Birth after Cesarean and Elective Repeat Cesarean Delivery" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 13: 7696. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19137696

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