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Article

The Psychosocial Burden of Families with Childhood Blood Cancer

Business School and GobLab UAI, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago 7941169, Chile
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Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010599
Received: 30 October 2021 / Revised: 7 December 2021 / Accepted: 14 December 2021 / Published: 5 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Economic Burden of Cancers)
Cancer is the second leading cause of death for children, and leukemias are the most common pediatric cancer diagnoses in Chile. Childhood cancer is a traumatic experience and is associated with distress, pain, and other negative experiences for patients and their families. Thus, psychosocial costs represent a large part of the overall burden of cancer. This study examines psychosocial experiences in a sample of 90 families of children with blood-related cancer in Chile. We provide a global overview of the family experience, focusing on patients, caregivers, and siblings. We find that most families report a negative impact upon diagnosis; disruptions in family dynamics; a range of negative feelings of the patient, such as depression, discouragement, and irritability; and difficulty with social lives. Additionally, they report negative effects in the relationship between the siblings of the patient and their parents, and within their caregivers’ spouse/partner relationship, as well as a worsening of the economic condition of the primary caregiver. Furthermore, over half of the families in the sample had to move due to diagnosis and/or treatment. Promoting interventions that can help patients, siblings, and parents cope with distress and promote resilience and well-being are important. View Full-Text
Keywords: childhood cancer; psychosocial cost; well-being; caregiver; siblings childhood cancer; psychosocial cost; well-being; caregiver; siblings
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MDPI and ACS Style

Borrescio-Higa, F.; Valdés, N. The Psychosocial Burden of Families with Childhood Blood Cancer. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 599. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010599

AMA Style

Borrescio-Higa F, Valdés N. The Psychosocial Burden of Families with Childhood Blood Cancer. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(1):599. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010599

Chicago/Turabian Style

Borrescio-Higa, Florencia, and Nieves Valdés. 2022. "The Psychosocial Burden of Families with Childhood Blood Cancer" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 1: 599. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010599

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