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Open AccessArticle

Association between Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Health Status in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

1
Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Science, Gachon University, (21936) 191 Hambakmoero, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21936, Korea
2
Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, (06974) 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 06974, Korea
3
College of Nursing, Gachon University, (21936) 191 Hambakmoero, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21936, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4889; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094889
Received: 1 April 2021 / Revised: 28 April 2021 / Accepted: 2 May 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
Diabetes mellitus (DM) can lead to poor oral health. However, oral health among diabetic patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is scarcely studied. This study aimed to elucidate the prevalence of oral health complications and the relationship between DM and oral health status in diabetic patients with CVDs. This retrospective nationwide cross-sectional study evaluated 3495 patients aged ≥40 years with CVD, with DM (n = 847) and without DM (n = 2648). The participant’s characteristics between the two groups were compared using the Chi-square test and t-test. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify associations between DM and oral health status. The prevalence of periodontitis (54.3% vs. 43.2%) and <20 number of remaining teeth (30.9% vs. 22.8%) was significantly higher in the DM than in the non-DM group. In the multivariate regression analysis, the incidence of periodontitis was 1.4 times higher in the DM group than in the non-DM after adjusting for confounders; however, the number of remaining teeth and active caries were not associated with DM. In conclusion, the oral health status of patients with coexisting CVD and DM should be assessed closely and actively. Healthcare professionals should provide accessible dental care services and develop strategies to improve patients’ oral health. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardiovascular diseases; diabetes mellitus; oral health; periodontitis cardiovascular diseases; diabetes mellitus; oral health; periodontitis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Han, S.-J.; Son, Y.-J.; Kim, B.-H. Association between Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Health Status in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Population-Based Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4889. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094889

AMA Style

Han S-J, Son Y-J, Kim B-H. Association between Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Health Status in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Population-Based Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4889. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094889

Chicago/Turabian Style

Han, Su-Jin; Son, Youn-Jung; Kim, Bo-Hwan. 2021. "Association between Diabetes Mellitus and Oral Health Status in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Population-Based Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 9: 4889. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094889

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