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Open AccessArticle

Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Risk Estimates—A Comparison of Different Action Spectra and Detector Responsivities

1
Institute of Radiology, Toxicology, and Civil Protection, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of South Bohemia, 37011 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
2
Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA), 44149 Dortmund, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Chiara Burattini, Alberto Modenese, Andrea Militello and Giacomo Salvadori
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4887; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094887
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 25 April 2021 / Accepted: 27 April 2021 / Published: 4 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health and Safety: Outdoor Workers and Sun Exposure)
Studies assessing the dose–response relationship for human skin cancer induction by solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) apply a range of methods to quantify relevant UVR doses, but information about the comparability of these datasets is scarce. We compared biologically weighted effectivities applying the most relevant UVR action spectra in order to test the ability of certain UVR detectors to mimic these biological effects at different times during the day and year. Our calculations were based on solar spectra measured at Dortmund, Germany (51.5° N) and at Townsville, Australia (19.3° S), or computed for latitudes 20° S and 50° N. Convolutions with the CIE action spectra for erythema and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and with ICNIRP’s weighting function showed comparable solar zenith angle (SZA) dependences with little influence of season or latitude. A different SZA dependence was found with Setlow’s action spectrum for melanoma induction. Calculations for a number of UVR detector responsivities gave widely discrepant absolute irradiances and doses, which were nevertheless related to those calculated with both CIE spectra by correction factors largely independent of the SZA. Commonly used detectors can thus provide quite accurate estimates of NMSC induction by solar UVR, whereas they may be inadequate to mimic melanoma induction. View Full-Text
Keywords: solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR); erythema; non-melanoma skin cancer; melanoma; action spectrum; detector responsivity; solar zenith angle (SZA); daily and annual course; correction factor solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR); erythema; non-melanoma skin cancer; melanoma; action spectrum; detector responsivity; solar zenith angle (SZA); daily and annual course; correction factor
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zölzer, F.; Bauer, S. Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Risk Estimates—A Comparison of Different Action Spectra and Detector Responsivities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4887. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094887

AMA Style

Zölzer F, Bauer S. Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Risk Estimates—A Comparison of Different Action Spectra and Detector Responsivities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4887. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094887

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zölzer, Friedo; Bauer, Stefan. 2021. "Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Risk Estimates—A Comparison of Different Action Spectra and Detector Responsivities" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 9: 4887. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094887

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