Next Article in Journal
Socioeconomic Conditioning of the Development of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Its Global Spatial Differentiation
Next Article in Special Issue
Design of a Spark Big Data Framework for PM2.5 Air Pollution Forecasting
Previous Article in Journal
Social Inequities in Urban Heat and Greenspace: Analyzing Climate Justice in Delhi, India
Previous Article in Special Issue
Analysis of Pneumonia Occurrence in Relation to Climate Change in Tanga, Tanzania
Article

A Comparative Assessment of Cooling Center Preparedness across Twenty-Five U.S. Cities

1
Department of Geography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
2
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou, Jongchul Park, Yong Jee Kim and Sung Moon Kwon
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4801; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094801
Received: 28 February 2021 / Revised: 23 April 2021 / Accepted: 28 April 2021 / Published: 30 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Health: Big Data Based Approach)
Cooling centers have played a significant role in reducing the risks of adverse health impacts of extreme heat exposure. However, there have been no comparative studies investigating cooling center preparedness in terms of population coverage, location efficiency, and population coverage disparities among different subpopulation groups. Using a catchment area method with a 0.8 km walking distance, we compared three aspects of cooling center preparedness across twenty-five cities in the U.S. We first calculated the percentage of the population covered by a single cooling center for each city. Then, the extracted values were separately compared to the city’s heat indexes, latitudes, and spatial patterns of cooling centers. Finally, we investigated population coverage disparities among multiple demographics (age, race/ethnicity) and socioeconomic (insurance, poverty) subpopulation groups by comparing the percentage of population coverage between selected subpopulation groups and reference subpopulation groups. Our results showed that cooler cities, higher latitude cities, and cities with dispersed cooling centers tend to be more prepared than warmer cities, lower latitude cities, and cities with clustered cooling centers across the U.S. Moreover, older people (≥65) had 9% lower population coverage than younger people (≤64). Our results suggest that the placement of future cooling centers should consider both the location of other nearby cooling centers and the spatial distribution of subpopulations to maximize population coverage and reduce access disparities among several subpopulations. View Full-Text
Keywords: cooling center; preparedness; heat waves; extreme heat; population coverage; subpopulation groups; disparity cooling center; preparedness; heat waves; extreme heat; population coverage; subpopulation groups; disparity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, K.; Jung, J.; Schollaert, C.; Spector, J.T. A Comparative Assessment of Cooling Center Preparedness across Twenty-Five U.S. Cities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 4801. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094801

AMA Style

Kim K, Jung J, Schollaert C, Spector JT. A Comparative Assessment of Cooling Center Preparedness across Twenty-Five U.S. Cities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(9):4801. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094801

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Kyusik, Jihoon Jung, Claire Schollaert, and June T. Spector. 2021. "A Comparative Assessment of Cooling Center Preparedness across Twenty-Five U.S. Cities" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 9: 4801. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094801

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop