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Article

Multiple Physical Symptoms Are Useful to Identify High Risk Individuals for Burnout: A Study on Faculties and Hospital Workers in Japan

1
Department of Anesthesiology, National Hospital Organization Saitama Hospital, Saitama 351-0102, Japan
2
Department of Public Health, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Akita 010-8543, Japan
3
Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Teikyo University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo 173-0003, Japan
4
Division of Nursing, Teikyo University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo 173-0003, Japan
5
Support Center for Women Physicians and Researchers, Teikyo University, Tokyo 173-0003, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Juan A. Moriano and Ana Laguía
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3246; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063246
Received: 21 February 2021 / Revised: 9 March 2021 / Accepted: 17 March 2021 / Published: 21 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Stress and Health: Psychological Burden and Burnout)
Healthcare workers have a high risk of burnout. This study aimed to investigate if the numbers of physical symptoms are associated with burnout among healthcare workers. We conducted a cross-sectional survey at a large university in Tokyo, Japan, in 2016. Participants were 1080: 525 faculties and 555 hospital workers. We investigated 16 physical symptoms perceived more than once per week and examined the association between the number of physical symptoms and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI); work-related (WBO), personal (PBO), and client-related (CBO) burnout. All CBI scores were higher among hospital workers than among faculties: WBO (43 vs. 29), PBO (50 vs. 33), CBO (33 vs. 29). Moreover, the higher the number of physical symptoms perceived, the higher the degree of burnout scores became (trend p-values < 0.001), except for CBO among faculties. Job strain (all except for CBO among hospital workers) and work–family conflict were associated with an increased risk of burnout. Being married (WBO and CBO among faculties), having a child (except for PBO and CBO among faculties), and job support (faculty and hospital workers with WBO and faculties with PBO) were associated with a decreased risk of burnout. Multiple physical symptoms might be useful for identifying high risk individuals for burnout. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical symptoms; burnout; Copenhagen Burnout Inventory; hospital workers; faculties; work–family conflict physical symptoms; burnout; Copenhagen Burnout Inventory; hospital workers; faculties; work–family conflict
MDPI and ACS Style

Chatani, Y.; Nomura, K.; Hiraike, H.; Tsuchiya, A.; Okinaga, H. Multiple Physical Symptoms Are Useful to Identify High Risk Individuals for Burnout: A Study on Faculties and Hospital Workers in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3246. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063246

AMA Style

Chatani Y, Nomura K, Hiraike H, Tsuchiya A, Okinaga H. Multiple Physical Symptoms Are Useful to Identify High Risk Individuals for Burnout: A Study on Faculties and Hospital Workers in Japan. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):3246. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063246

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chatani, Yuki, Kyoko Nomura, Haruko Hiraike, Akiko Tsuchiya, and Hiroko Okinaga. 2021. "Multiple Physical Symptoms Are Useful to Identify High Risk Individuals for Burnout: A Study on Faculties and Hospital Workers in Japan" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 3246. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063246

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