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Article

Sedentary Work and Physiological Markers of Health

1
OHSU-PSU School of Public Health, Portland, OR 97239, USA
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Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA
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School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
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School of Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA
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School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(6), 3230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063230
Received: 23 February 2021 / Revised: 11 March 2021 / Accepted: 17 March 2021 / Published: 20 March 2021
The purpose of this study is to examine associations between objectively measured workplace sedentary behavior and physiological markers of health. We hypothesize that increased sedentary time and more frequent bouts of uninterrupted sitting are associated with increased hemoglobin A1c, increased blood pressure, and impaired endothelial function. Call center employees (N = 241) were enrolled from four worksites in the United States. Participants completed a survey and a physical health assessment. Sedentary behavior and sitting/standing time at work were quantified using an accelerometer. Hemoglobin A1c was measured using a finger-prick and portable analyzer. Blood pressure was measured with an automated cuff, and vascular endothelial function was assessed in a subsample of participants (n = 56) using EndoPAT. We analyzed data with two series of ordinary least squares regressions, first to examine relationships between bouts of uninterrupted sitting and physiological outcomes, and second to examine relationships between physical activity and sitting/standing time at work and physiological outcomes. The sample was primarily female, and on average was obese, prehypertensive, and prediabetic. There were no significant relationships between bouts of uninterrupted sitting or physical activity/sitting/standing time at work and physiological outcomes. In a sample that is predominantly sedentary, at risk for cardiovascular disease, and prediabetic, there are no significant associations between workplace sedentary behavior and physiological markers. The lack of associations could be related to either physiological adaptations or ceiling effects in this sample. View Full-Text
Keywords: sedentary behavior; uninterrupted sitting; occupational health; endothelial function; hemoglobin A1c sedentary behavior; uninterrupted sitting; occupational health; endothelial function; hemoglobin A1c
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wipfli, B.; Wild, S.; Donovan, C.; Hanson, G.C.; Thosar, S.S. Sedentary Work and Physiological Markers of Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3230. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063230

AMA Style

Wipfli B, Wild S, Donovan C, Hanson GC, Thosar SS. Sedentary Work and Physiological Markers of Health. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(6):3230. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063230

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wipfli, Brad, Sara Wild, Courtney Donovan, Ginger C. Hanson, and Saurabh S. Thosar 2021. "Sedentary Work and Physiological Markers of Health" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 6: 3230. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063230

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