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Article

Classifying Alcohol Control Policies with Respect to Expected Changes in Consumption and Alcohol-Attributable Harm: The Example of Lithuania, 2000–2019

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Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), 33 Ursula Franklin Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada
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Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, CAMH, 250 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1R8, Canada
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Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technische Universität Dresden, Chemnitzer Str. 46, 01187 Dresden, Germany
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Center for Interdisciplinary Addiction Research (ZIS), Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraße 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
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Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, 8th Floor, Toronto, ON M5T 1R8, Canada
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Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College Street, 6th Floor, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada
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Institute of Medical Science (IMS), University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King’s College Circle, Room 2374, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
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Department of International Health Projects, Institute for Leadership and Health Management, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Trubetskaya Str., 8, b. 2, 119992 Moscow, Russia
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Health Research Institute, Faculty of Public Health, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Tilžės Str. 18, 47181 Kaunas, Lithuania
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Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Public Health, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Tilžės Str. 18, 47181 Kaunas, Lithuania
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WHO European Office for Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, Leontyevsky Pereulok 9, 125009 Moscow, Russia
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Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, Building NR-1, La Trobe University, Plenty Rd. x Kingsbury Rd., Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
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Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University, 3rd Floor, Sveavägen 160, 113 46 Stockholm, Sweden
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SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, College of Health, Massey University, 90 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
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Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Semmelweisstraße 10, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jimmy T. Efird
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052419
Received: 15 January 2021 / Revised: 17 February 2021 / Accepted: 23 February 2021 / Published: 2 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Public Health Statistics and Risk Assessment)
Due to the high levels of alcohol use, alcohol-attributable mortality and burden of disease, and detrimental drinking patterns, Lithuania implemented a series of alcohol control policies within a relatively short period of time, between 2008 and 2019. Based on their expected impact on alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable harm, as well as their target population, these policies have been classified using a set of objective criteria and expert opinion. The classification criteria included: positive vs. negative outcomes, mainly immediate vs. delayed outcomes, and general population vs. specific group outcomes. The judgement of the alcohol policy experts converged on the objective criteria, and, as a result, two tiers of intervention were identified: Tier 1—highly effective general population interventions with an anticipated immediate impact; Tier 2—other interventions aimed at the general population. In addition, interventions directed at specific populations were identified. This adaptable methodological approach to alcohol control policy classification is intended to provide guidance and support for the evaluation of alcohol policies elsewhere, to lay the foundation for the critical assessment of the policies to improve health and increase life expectancy, and to reduce crime and violence. View Full-Text
Keywords: alcohol control policy; best buys; classification; evaluation; taxation; availability; marketing; Lithuania alcohol control policy; best buys; classification; evaluation; taxation; availability; marketing; Lithuania
MDPI and ACS Style

Rehm, J.; Štelemėkas, M.; Ferreira-Borges, C.; Jiang, H.; Lange, S.; Neufeld, M.; Room, R.; Casswell, S.; Tran, A.; Manthey, J. Classifying Alcohol Control Policies with Respect to Expected Changes in Consumption and Alcohol-Attributable Harm: The Example of Lithuania, 2000–2019. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2419. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052419

AMA Style

Rehm J, Štelemėkas M, Ferreira-Borges C, Jiang H, Lange S, Neufeld M, Room R, Casswell S, Tran A, Manthey J. Classifying Alcohol Control Policies with Respect to Expected Changes in Consumption and Alcohol-Attributable Harm: The Example of Lithuania, 2000–2019. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(5):2419. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052419

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rehm, Jürgen, Mindaugas Štelemėkas, Carina Ferreira-Borges, Huan Jiang, Shannon Lange, Maria Neufeld, Robin Room, Sally Casswell, Alexander Tran, and Jakob Manthey. 2021. "Classifying Alcohol Control Policies with Respect to Expected Changes in Consumption and Alcohol-Attributable Harm: The Example of Lithuania, 2000–2019" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 5: 2419. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052419

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