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Assessing Differences in the Implementation of Smoke-Free Contracts—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the School Randomized Controlled Trial X:IT

1
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Studiestraede 6a, 1455 Copenhagen, Denmark
2
Steno Diabetes Center, Hedeager 3, 8200 Aarhus, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042163
Received: 20 January 2021 / Revised: 16 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Objective: The X:IT study is a school-based smoking preventive intervention that has previously been evaluated in a large randomized controlled trial (RCT) with good effects. However, the actual effect for participating students depends on the individual implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the implementation of smoke-free contract, which is one of the three main intervention components. Specifically, we examined whether it was implemented equally across family occupational social class (OSC), separately for boys and girls, the joint effect of OSC and gender, and the participants’ own reasons for not signing a contract. Results: Overall, the smoke-free contract was well implemented; 81.8% of pupils (total N = 2.015) signed a contract (girls 85.1, boys 78.6%). We found a social gradient among girls; more than 90% were in OSC group I vs. 75% in group VI. Among boys, however, we found no difference across OSC. Boys in all the OSC groups had about half the odds (i.e., medium OSC boys: OR = 0.48 (95% CI: 0.32–0.72) of having a smoke-free contract compared to girls from a high OSC. Conclusion: future interventions should include initiatives to involve families from all OSC groups and allow for different preferences among boys and girls. View Full-Text
Keywords: school-based smoking prevention; implementation; adolescents; social inequality; gender differences school-based smoking prevention; implementation; adolescents; social inequality; gender differences
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bast, L.S.; Andersen, S.; Glenstrup, S.; Damsgaard, M.T.; Andersen, A. Assessing Differences in the Implementation of Smoke-Free Contracts—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the School Randomized Controlled Trial X:IT. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042163

AMA Style

Bast LS, Andersen S, Glenstrup S, Damsgaard MT, Andersen A. Assessing Differences in the Implementation of Smoke-Free Contracts—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the School Randomized Controlled Trial X:IT. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):2163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042163

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bast, Lotus S.; Andersen, Susan; Glenstrup, Stine; Damsgaard, Mogens T.; Andersen, Anette. 2021. "Assessing Differences in the Implementation of Smoke-Free Contracts—A Cross-Sectional Analysis from the School Randomized Controlled Trial X:IT" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 4: 2163. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042163

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