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Open AccessArticle

Validity of DSM-5 Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Children with Intellectual Disability

1
Institute on Community Integration, University of Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
2
Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments, University of Salamanca, 37005 Salamanca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041977
Received: 16 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 11 February 2021 / Published: 18 February 2021
Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed disorders in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, the high variability of results in prevalence studies suggests problems that should be investigated further, such as the possible overlap between some ODD symptoms and challenging behaviors that are especially prevalent in children with ID. The study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in the functioning of ODD symptoms between children with (n = 189) and without (n = 474) intellectual disabilities. To do so, we analyzed the extent to which parental ratings on DSM-5 ODD symptoms were metrically invariant between groups using models based on item response theory. The results indicated that two symptoms were non-invariant, with degrees of bias ranging from moderately high (“annoys others on purpose”) to moderately low (“argues with adults”). Caution is advised in the use of these symptoms for the assessment and diagnosis of ODD in children with ID. Once the bias was controlled, the measurement model suggested prevalences of 8.4% (children with ID) and 3% (typically developing children). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: oppositional defiant disorder; dual diagnosis; intellectual disabilities; diagnostic overshadowing; dual diagnosis; DSM-5 oppositional defiant disorder; dual diagnosis; intellectual disabilities; diagnostic overshadowing; dual diagnosis; DSM-5
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MDPI and ACS Style

Arias, V.B.; Aguayo, V.; Navas, P. Validity of DSM-5 Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Children with Intellectual Disability. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1977. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041977

AMA Style

Arias VB, Aguayo V, Navas P. Validity of DSM-5 Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Children with Intellectual Disability. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1977. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041977

Chicago/Turabian Style

Arias, Victor B.; Aguayo, Virginia; Navas, Patricia. 2021. "Validity of DSM-5 Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms in Children with Intellectual Disability" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 4: 1977. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041977

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