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Open AccessArticle

Physical Activity, Mental Health, and Well-Being in Very Pre-Term and Term Born Adolescents: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Two Accelerometry Studies

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Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
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Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Sport Sciences Section, University of Basel, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland
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School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, UK
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Department of Paediatrics, University of Lübeck, 23562 Lübeck, Germany
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Psychiatric Clinics, Center for Affective, Stress, and Sleep Disorders, University of Basel, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland
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Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah 6715847141, Iran
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Substance Abuse Prevention Research Center, Health Institute, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah 6715847141, Iran
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School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran 1417863181, Iran
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Department of Psychology, University of Basel, CH-4055 Basel, Switzerland
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Division of Neuropediatrics and Developmental Medicine, University Children’s Hospital Basel, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
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Department of Psychology & Logopedics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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Psychology/Welfare Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, FI-33720 Tampere, Finland
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National Institute of Health and Welfare, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland
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PEDEGO Research Unit, Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland
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Children’s Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital and the University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
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Department of Psychology, Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sven Bremberg
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1735; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041735
Received: 11 December 2020 / Revised: 22 January 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 10 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Adolescents)
This study examined whether physical activity is associated with better mental health and well-being among very preterm (≤32 weeks) and term born (≥37 weeks) adolescents alike or whether the associations are stronger in either of the groups. Physical activity was measured with accelerometry in children born very preterm and at term in two cohorts, the Basel Study of Preterm Children (BSPC; 40 adolescents born ≤32 weeks of gestation and 59 term born controls aged 12.3 years) and the Millennium Cohort Study (MCS; 45 adolescents born ≤32 weeks of gestation and 3137 term born controls aged 14.2 years on average). In both cohorts, emotional and behavioral problems were mother-reported using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Subjective well-being was self-reported using the Kidscreen-52 Questionnaire in the BSPC and single items in the MCS. Hierarchical regressions with ‘preterm status × physical activity’-interaction effects were subjected to individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis. IPD meta-analysis showed that higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower levels of peer problems, and higher levels of psychological well-being, better self-perception/body image, and school related well-being. Overall, the effect-sizes were small and the associations did not differ significantly between very preterm and term born adolescents. Future research may examine the mechanisms behind effects of physical activity on mental health and wellbeing in adolescence as well as which type of physical activity might be most beneficial for term and preterm born children. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; mental health; well-being; preterm birth; adolescence; accelerometry physical activity; mental health; well-being; preterm birth; adolescence; accelerometry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brylka, A.; Wolke, D.; Ludyga, S.; Bilgin, A.; Spiegler, J.; Trower, H.; Gkiouleka, A.; Gerber, M.; Brand, S.; Grob, A.; Weber, P.; Heinonen, K.; Kajantie, E.; Räikkönen, K.; Lemola, S. Physical Activity, Mental Health, and Well-Being in Very Pre-Term and Term Born Adolescents: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Two Accelerometry Studies. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1735. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041735

AMA Style

Brylka A, Wolke D, Ludyga S, Bilgin A, Spiegler J, Trower H, Gkiouleka A, Gerber M, Brand S, Grob A, Weber P, Heinonen K, Kajantie E, Räikkönen K, Lemola S. Physical Activity, Mental Health, and Well-Being in Very Pre-Term and Term Born Adolescents: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Two Accelerometry Studies. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1735. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041735

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brylka, Asteria; Wolke, Dieter; Ludyga, Sebastian; Bilgin, Ayten; Spiegler, Juliane; Trower, Hayley; Gkiouleka, Anna; Gerber, Markus; Brand, Serge; Grob, Alexander; Weber, Peter; Heinonen, Kati; Kajantie, Eero; Räikkönen, Katri; Lemola, Sakari. 2021. "Physical Activity, Mental Health, and Well-Being in Very Pre-Term and Term Born Adolescents: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Two Accelerometry Studies" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 4: 1735. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041735

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