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Review

Definitions and Prevalence of Multimorbidity in Large Database Studies: A Scoping Review

1
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore
2
Clinical Research Unit, National Healthcare Group Polyclinics, Singapore 138543, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1673; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041673
Received: 25 December 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2021 / Accepted: 5 February 2021 / Published: 9 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Background: Multimorbidity presents a key challenge to healthcare systems globally. However, heterogeneity in the definition of multimorbidity and design of epidemiological studies results in difficulty in comparing multimorbidity studies. This scoping review aimed to describe multimorbidity prevalence in studies using large datasets and report the differences in multimorbidity definition and study design. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases to identify large epidemiological studies on multimorbidity. We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) protocol for reporting the results. Results: Twenty articles were identified. We found two key definitions of multimorbidity: at least two (MM2+) or at least three (MM3+) chronic conditions. The prevalence of multimorbidity MM2+ ranged from 15.3% to 93.1%, and 11.8% to 89.7% in MM3+. The number of chronic conditions used by the articles ranged from 15 to 147, which were organized into 21 body system categories. There were seventeen cross-sectional studies and three retrospective cohort studies, and four diagnosis coding systems were used. Conclusions: We found a wide range in reported prevalence, definition, and conduct of multimorbidity studies. Obtaining consensus in these areas will facilitate better understanding of the magnitude and epidemiology of multimorbidity. View Full-Text
Keywords: multimorbidity; prevalence; definition; large database multimorbidity; prevalence; definition; large database
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chua, Y.P.; Xie, Y.; Lee, P.S.S.; Lee, E.S. Definitions and Prevalence of Multimorbidity in Large Database Studies: A Scoping Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041673

AMA Style

Chua YP, Xie Y, Lee PSS, Lee ES. Definitions and Prevalence of Multimorbidity in Large Database Studies: A Scoping Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(4):1673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041673

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chua, Ying P., Ying Xie, Poay S.S. Lee, and Eng S. Lee. 2021. "Definitions and Prevalence of Multimorbidity in Large Database Studies: A Scoping Review" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 4: 1673. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041673

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