Next Article in Journal
Go Green and Recycle: Analyzing the Usage of Plastic Bags for Shopping in China
Previous Article in Journal
A Qualitative Exploration in Causes of Water Insecurity Experiences, and Gender and Nutritional Consequences in South-Punjab, Pakistan
Article

Association between Handwashing Behavior and Infectious Diseases among Low-Income Community Children in Urban New Delhi, India: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Department of Population Health, College of Health Sciences, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341, USA
2
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
3
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA 02114, USA
4
Amity Institute of Virology and Immunology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida 201313, India
5
Sustainable Environment and Ecological Development Society (SEEDS), New Delhi 110022, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alessandra Casuccio
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(23), 12535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312535
Received: 1 October 2021 / Revised: 20 November 2021 / Accepted: 23 November 2021 / Published: 28 November 2021
Diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections (RI) are two leading causes of childhood mortality in low and middle-income countries. Effective handwashing at critical time-points may mitigate these diseases. However, there is a lack of published data investigating this association in school-aged children in India. This study is part of a larger prospective handwashing intervention study in a low-income community in New Delhi, India examining the associations between handwashing behavior and diarrhea and RI in schoolchildren. This current study reports the findings of the baseline survey administered to 272 mother–child dyads. Children aged 8–12 years, and their mothers, were recruited from six schools. A baseline questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data, handwash behavior, and mother-reported recent diarrhea and RI incidence among the children. Handwashing before and after preparing food, after defecation, and after cleaning dishes significantly reduced the odds of diarrhea by over 70%, and of RI by over 56%. Using a clean cloth after handwashing lowered odds of diarrhea and RI by 72% and 63% respectively. Around 60% of the participants believed that handwashing could prevent diarrhea and RI in their children. There was a low prevalence of handwashing at critical time-points and a poor perception regarding handwashing benefits. To improve handwashing behavior, hygiene promotion programs need to understand what motivates and hinders handwashing in vulnerable populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: diarrhea; handwashing critical time points; respiratory infections; schoolchildren diarrhea; handwashing critical time points; respiratory infections; schoolchildren
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Khan, K.M.; Chakraborty, R.; Brown, S.; Sultana, R.; Colon, A.; Toor, D.; Upreti, P.; Sen, B. Association between Handwashing Behavior and Infectious Diseases among Low-Income Community Children in Urban New Delhi, India: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 12535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312535

AMA Style

Khan KM, Chakraborty R, Brown S, Sultana R, Colon A, Toor D, Upreti P, Sen B. Association between Handwashing Behavior and Infectious Diseases among Low-Income Community Children in Urban New Delhi, India: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(23):12535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312535

Chicago/Turabian Style

Khan, Khalid M., Rishika Chakraborty, Stephen Brown, Rasheda Sultana, Alec Colon, Devinder Toor, Pooja Upreti, and Banalata Sen. 2021. "Association between Handwashing Behavior and Infectious Diseases among Low-Income Community Children in Urban New Delhi, India: A Cross-Sectional Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 23: 12535. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312535

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop