Next Article in Journal
Investigation of Critical Geotechnical, Petrological and Mineralogical Parameters for Landslides in Deeply Weathered Dunite Rock (Medellín, Colombia)
Previous Article in Journal
Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS): Significance and Considerations within the Regulatory Framework of the USA
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development of a Digital Case Management Tool for Community Based Inclusive Development Program
Article

Use of the Washington Group Questions in Non-Government Programming

Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11143; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111143
Received: 31 July 2021 / Revised: 16 October 2021 / Accepted: 19 October 2021 / Published: 23 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Measuring Disability and Disability Inclusive Development)
The Washington Group questions (WGQ) on functioning have been widely promoted as the go-to tool for disability data collection. Designed for use by government, the WGQ have been adopted by non-government organizations (NGOs) for use in programming. However, little is known about how the WGQs are being used by NGOs or how use may be contributing to disability inclusion. Method: This paper describes exploratory research on the use of the WGQ in NGO programming. An online survey provided an overview of adoption followed by semi-structured interviews from a purposive sample to explore data collection, analysis, and use. Results: Thematic analysis showed limited inclusion outcomes directly attributable to use of the WGQ, adoption driven by individual champions rather than systematically across organizations, and challenges in data collection resulting in a wide range of prevalence rates. What information the WGQ can realistically contribute to programs was also overestimated. However, the process of using the WGQ was raising awareness on disability inclusion within program teams and communities. Conclusion: Acknowledging differences in emerging use by NGOs beyond the WGQ’s intended purpose, alongside promoting a flexible and staged approach to adoption and use in programming, may improve utility and disability inclusion outcomes over time. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability; functioning; data; inclusion; Washington group; non-government organizations disability; functioning; data; inclusion; Washington group; non-government organizations
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Robinson, A.; Nguyen, L.; Smith, F. Use of the Washington Group Questions in Non-Government Programming. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11143. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111143

AMA Style

Robinson A, Nguyen L, Smith F. Use of the Washington Group Questions in Non-Government Programming. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11143. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111143

Chicago/Turabian Style

Robinson, Alex, Liem Nguyen, and Fleur Smith. 2021. "Use of the Washington Group Questions in Non-Government Programming" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11143. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111143

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop