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Article

Do Crowding-Out Effects Explain the Low Effect of a Health Promotion Intervention among Young People at a Vocational School?

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Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark
2
Department of Sociology and Social Work, Aalborg University, Fibigerstræde 13, 122, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark
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School of Health, University of Aveiro, Edifício 30, Agras do Crasto-Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
4
Center for Health Technology and Services Research, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3800-193 Aveiro, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Carlos Salavera
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11127; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111127
Received: 8 October 2021 / Accepted: 15 October 2021 / Published: 22 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Behavioral Problems in Childhood and Adolescence)
In recent years, school-based interventions have increasingly been used as a strategy to promote good eating habits and physical activity among young people at school. However, little is known about the effect that this kind of public involvement has on the overall behavior of young people. Economists refer to the existence of a crowding-out effect when public sector engagement in influencing behavior is counteracted by behaviors at the individual level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a health promotion intervention program among young people at a vocational school on the overall behavior of the students and consider whether a crowding-out effect existed when it came to health behavior. This study used data from the Gearing up the Body (GUB) intervention that was carried out at the vocational school of Uddannelsescenter Holstebro, Denmark. The study included 130 students from two vocational programs. Answers were collected from survey questions in three waves. Our results showed that intervening in the school setting had the intended impact on physical activity but an unintended impact on eating behavior. In the GUB study, we found signs of countervailing behaviors in and out of school that need to be further explored. View Full-Text
Keywords: school-based intervention; vocational education; crowding out school-based intervention; vocational education; crowding out
MDPI and ACS Style

Mikkelsen, B.E.; Romani, A.Q.; Brandão, M.P. Do Crowding-Out Effects Explain the Low Effect of a Health Promotion Intervention among Young People at a Vocational School? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111127

AMA Style

Mikkelsen BE, Romani AQ, Brandão MP. Do Crowding-Out Effects Explain the Low Effect of a Health Promotion Intervention among Young People at a Vocational School? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111127

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mikkelsen, Bent E., Annette Q. Romani, and Maria P. Brandão 2021. "Do Crowding-Out Effects Explain the Low Effect of a Health Promotion Intervention among Young People at a Vocational School?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11127. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111127

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