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Article

Differences in Perceived Risk of Contracting SARS-CoV-2 during and after the Lockdown in Sub-Saharan African Countries

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Translational Health Research Unit (THRI), School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
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Westville Campus, African Vision Research Institute, Discipline of Optometry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 3629, South Africa
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Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, School of Public Health, Biomedical Sciences and Technology, Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology, Kakamega 190-50100, Kenya
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Health Division, University of Bamenda, Bambili P.O. Box 39, Bamenda 00237, Cameroon
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Department of Optometry and Vision Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health and Allied Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast 00233, Ghana
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Department of Psychiatry, College of Health Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos 930003, Nigeria
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Department of Public Health, Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar 540271, Cross River State, Nigeria
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Department of Optometry, Centre for Health Sciences, University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness IV2 3JH, UK
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Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos 930003, Nigeria
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School of Management and Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6151, Australia
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Department of Computer Science, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos 930003, Nigeria
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Tanzania Food and Nutrition Center, P.O. Box 977, Dar es Salaam 11101, Tanzania
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Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, Jos 930003, Nigeria
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County Durham and Darlington, National Health Service (NHS) Foundation, Darlington DL3 0PD, UK
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School of Health Science, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jimmy T. Efird
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11091; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111091
Received: 7 October 2021 / Revised: 17 October 2021 / Accepted: 18 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Assessment for COVID-19)
This study investigated risk perception of contracting and dying of SARS-CoV-2 in sub-Sahara Africa during and after the lockdown periods. Two online surveys were conducted one year apart, with participants 18 years and above living in sub-Sahara Africa or the diaspora. Each survey took four weeks. The first survey was taken from 18 April to 16 May 2020, i.e., during the lockdown. The second survey was taken from 14 April to 14 May 2021, i.e., after the lockdown. A cross-sectional study using adopted and modified questionnaires for both surveys were distributed through online platforms. Question about risks perception of contracting and dying of SARS-CoV-2 were asked. The Helsinki declaration was applied, and ethical approvals were obtained. Total responses for both surveys, i.e., both during and after the lockdown, was 4605. The mean age was similar in both surveys (18–28 years). The mean risk perception scores were higher after lockdown by 3.59%. Factors associated with risk perception of COVID-19 were survey period, age group, region of residence, and occupation. Non-health care workers had a lower risk perception of COVID-19. This first comparative study on the level of risk perception of Africans during and after the lockdown shows that one in every three and every four persons in sub-Sahara Africa felt at high risk of contracting COVID-19 and thought they could die from contracting the same, respectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; sub-Sahara Africa; risks perception SARS-CoV-2; sub-Sahara Africa; risks perception
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MDPI and ACS Style

Osuagwu, U.L.; Timothy, C.G.; Langsi, R.; Abu, E.K.; Goson, P.C.; Mashige, K.P.; Ekpenyong, B.; Ovenseri-Ogbomo, G.O.; Miner, C.A.; Oloruntoba, R.; Ishaya, T.; Charwe, D.D.; Envuladu, E.A.; Nwaeze, O.; Agho, K.E. Differences in Perceived Risk of Contracting SARS-CoV-2 during and after the Lockdown in Sub-Saharan African Countries. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11091. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111091

AMA Style

Osuagwu UL, Timothy CG, Langsi R, Abu EK, Goson PC, Mashige KP, Ekpenyong B, Ovenseri-Ogbomo GO, Miner CA, Oloruntoba R, Ishaya T, Charwe DD, Envuladu EA, Nwaeze O, Agho KE. Differences in Perceived Risk of Contracting SARS-CoV-2 during and after the Lockdown in Sub-Saharan African Countries. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11091. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111091

Chicago/Turabian Style

Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L., Chikasirimobi G. Timothy, Raymond Langsi, Emmanuel K. Abu, Piwuna C. Goson, Khathutshelo P. Mashige, Bernadine Ekpenyong, Godwin O. Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Chundung A. Miner, Richard Oloruntoba, Tanko Ishaya, Deborah D. Charwe, Esther A. Envuladu, Obinna Nwaeze, and Kingsley E. Agho 2021. "Differences in Perceived Risk of Contracting SARS-CoV-2 during and after the Lockdown in Sub-Saharan African Countries" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11091. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111091

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