Next Article in Journal
In Vitro Effects of Particulate Matter Associated with a Wildland Fire in the North-West of Italy
Next Article in Special Issue
Relationships, Decisions, and Physical Effort in the Marro Traditional Sporting Game: A Multimodal Approach
Previous Article in Journal
Influence of Publicity and Education and Environmental Values on the Green Consumption Behavior of Urban Residents in Tibet
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sprint Variables Are Associated with the Odds Ratios of Non-Contact Injuries in Professional Soccer Players
 
 
Article

Do Blood Lactate Levels Affect the Kinematic Patterns of Jump Shots in Handball?

1
Faculty of Kinesiology, The Laboratory for Sports Games, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
High School Jastrebarsko, 10450 Jastrebarsko, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Hadi Nobari, Jorge Pérez-Gómez and Juan Pedro Fuentes García
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10809; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010809
Received: 30 August 2021 / Revised: 11 October 2021 / Accepted: 12 October 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Training for Optimal Sports Performance and Health)
The aim of this study was to determine whether the dynamic motor stereotype of movement (shooting technique) is violated under conditions of an increased lactate concentration in a player’s blood after a 30–15 intermittent fitness test. The hypotheses was that there would be statistically significant differences in ball speed and shooting accuracy in jump shots on the goal before and after the occurrence of fatigue in the player. The sample of respondents consisted of 10 top-level handball players of the highest competition rank in Croatia. The results showed significant differences before and after the fatigue protocol in the run-up speed (F = 5.66; p = 0.02), in the maximum speed of the forearm (F = 5.85; p = 0.02) and the hand (F = 4.01; p = 0.04), in the speed in the shoulder joint (F = 5.39; p = 0.02) and wrist joint (F = 4.06; p = 0.04), and in the ball shooting speed (F = 5.42; p = 0.02). The accuracy of the shot was, on average, lower (36.20 vs. 33.17 cm) but not significantly so. High blood lactate levels affect changes in certain kinematic parameters during the performance of a jump shot in handball. Consequently, this reduces the speed of the shot, which can affect situational performance as one of the two significant parameters of scoring success. View Full-Text
Keywords: movement analysis; performance; handball shot; internal load; shot precision movement analysis; performance; handball shot; internal load; shot precision
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Belcic, I.; Rodić, S.; Dukarić, V.; Rupčić, T.; Knjaz, D. Do Blood Lactate Levels Affect the Kinematic Patterns of Jump Shots in Handball? Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10809. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010809

AMA Style

Belcic I, Rodić S, Dukarić V, Rupčić T, Knjaz D. Do Blood Lactate Levels Affect the Kinematic Patterns of Jump Shots in Handball? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(20):10809. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010809

Chicago/Turabian Style

Belcic, Ivan, Sasa Rodić, Vedran Dukarić, Tomislav Rupčić, and Damir Knjaz. 2021. "Do Blood Lactate Levels Affect the Kinematic Patterns of Jump Shots in Handball?" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 20: 10809. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010809

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop