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Article

High Intensity Training Is an Effective Modality to Improve Long-Term Disability and Exercise Capacity in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

1
REVAL—Rehabilitation Research Center, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hasselt University, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
2
Heart Centre Hasselt, Jessa Hospital, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium
3
Department of Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege, Belgium
4
Adelante Centre of Expertise in Rehabilitation and Audiology, 6432CC Hoensbroek, The Netherlands
5
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Maastricht University, 6211LK Maastricht, The Netherlands
6
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, 2000 Antwerp, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alberto Soriano-Maldonado
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10779; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010779
Received: 14 June 2021 / Revised: 26 July 2021 / Accepted: 28 July 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
Previous research indicates that high intensity training (HIT) is a more effective exercise modality, as opposed to moderate intensity training (MIT), to improve disability and physical performance in persons with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNSLBP). However, it is unclear how well benefits are maintained after intervention cessation. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of HIT on disability, pain intensity, patient-specific functioning, exercise capacity, and trunk muscle strength, and to compare the long-term effectiveness of HIT with MIT in persons with CNSLBP. Persons with CNSLBP (n = 35) who participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing effects of an HIT versus MIT intervention (24 sessions/12 weeks) were included for evaluation at baseline (PRE), directly after (POST), and six months after program finalization (FU) on disability, pain intensity, exercise capacity, patient-specific functioning, and trunk muscle strength. A general linear model was used to evaluate PRE-FU and POST-FU deltas of these outcome measures in each group (time effects) and differences between HIT and MIT (interaction effects). Ultimately, twenty-nine participants (mean age = 44.1 year) were analysed (HIT:16; MIT:13). Six participants were lost to follow-up. At FU, pain intensity, disability, and patient-specific functioning were maintained at the level of POST (which was significant from PRE, p < 0.05) in both groups. However, HIT led to a greater conservation of lowered disability and improved exercise capacity when compared with MIT (p < 0.05). HIT leads to a greater maintenance of lowered disability and improved exercise capacity when compared to MIT six months after cessation of a 12-week supervised exercise therapy intervention, in persons with CNSLBP. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic low back pain; exercise therapy; high intensity training chronic low back pain; exercise therapy; high intensity training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Verbrugghe, J.; Hansen, D.; Demoulin, C.; Verbunt, J.; Roussel, N.A.; Timmermans, A. High Intensity Training Is an Effective Modality to Improve Long-Term Disability and Exercise Capacity in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10779. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010779

AMA Style

Verbrugghe J, Hansen D, Demoulin C, Verbunt J, Roussel NA, Timmermans A. High Intensity Training Is an Effective Modality to Improve Long-Term Disability and Exercise Capacity in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(20):10779. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010779

Chicago/Turabian Style

Verbrugghe, Jonas, Dominique Hansen, Christophe Demoulin, Jeanine Verbunt, Nathalie Anne Roussel, and Annick Timmermans. 2021. "High Intensity Training Is an Effective Modality to Improve Long-Term Disability and Exercise Capacity in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 20: 10779. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010779

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