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Article

Wellbeing Literacy: A Capability Model for Wellbeing Science and Practice

Centre for Positive Psychology, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020719
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 12 January 2021 / Accepted: 13 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Contribution of Positive Psychology and Wellbeing Literacy)
Wellbeing science is the scientific investigation of wellbeing, its’ antecedents and consequences. Alongside growth of wellbeing science is significant interest in wellbeing interventions at individual, organizational and population levels, including measurement of national accounts of wellbeing. In this concept paper, we propose the capability model of wellbeing literacy as a new model for wellbeing science and practice. Wellbeing literacy is defined as a capability to comprehend and compose wellbeing language, across contexts, with the intention of using such language to maintain or improve the wellbeing of oneself, others or the world. Wellbeing literacy is underpinned by a capability model (i.e., what someone is able to be and do), and is based on constructivist (i.e., language shapes reality) and contextualist (i.e., words have different meanings in different contexts) epistemologies. The proposed capability model of wellbeing literacy adds to wellbeing science by providing a tangible way to assess mechanisms learned from wellbeing interventions. Moreover, it provides a framework for practitioners to understand and plan wellbeing communications. Workplaces and families as examples are discussed as relevant contexts for application of wellbeing literacy, and future directions for wellbeing literacy research are outlined. View Full-Text
Keywords: wellbeing; literacy; wellbeing literacy; capability wellbeing; literacy; wellbeing literacy; capability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oades, L.G.; Jarden, A.; Hou, H.; Ozturk, C.; Williams, P.; R. Slemp, G.; Huang, L. Wellbeing Literacy: A Capability Model for Wellbeing Science and Practice. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020719

AMA Style

Oades LG, Jarden A, Hou H, Ozturk C, Williams P, R. Slemp G, Huang L. Wellbeing Literacy: A Capability Model for Wellbeing Science and Practice. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020719

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oades, Lindsay G., Aaron Jarden, Hanchao Hou, Corina Ozturk, Paige Williams, Gavin R. Slemp, and Lanxi Huang. 2021. "Wellbeing Literacy: A Capability Model for Wellbeing Science and Practice" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 2: 719. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020719

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