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Open AccessArticle

Leveraging the Work Environment to Minimize the Negative Impact of Nurse Burnout on Patient Outcomes

1
Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, NY 10032, USA
2
Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217, USA
3
Biostatistics Analysis Core (BECCA lab), Office of Nursing Research (ONR), University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4217, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(2), 610; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020610
Received: 20 December 2020 / Revised: 5 January 2021 / Accepted: 6 January 2021 / Published: 12 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout Syndrome and Prevention)
Background: Burnout remains a persistent issue affecting nurses across the US health system. Limited evidence exists about the direct impact of nurse burnout on patient outcomes. This study explores the relationship between nurse burnout and mortality, failure to rescue, and length of stay, while also considering the effect of a good work environment. Methods: Cross sectional data from nurses and hospitals were used in conjunction with patient claims data. Multivariate logistic regression was used to study the relationship between nurse burnout, patient outcomes, the work environment, and Magnet status. Results: Higher odds of patient mortality, failure to rescue, and prolonged length of stay were found in hospitals that had, on average, higher nurse burnout scores. Good work environments were found to attenuate the relationship between nurse burnout and mortality, failure to rescue, and length of stay. Magnet status, another indicator of a good work environment, was found to attenuate the relationship between nurse burnout and mortality and failure to rescue. Conclusions: Improving the work environment remains a solution for hospitals looking to concurrently improve nurse burnout and patient outcomes. Administrators may look to the Magnet recognition program as a blueprint to better support nurses in providing safe, high quality care. View Full-Text
Keywords: nurse burnout; burnout; work environment; Magnet; patient outcomes nurse burnout; burnout; work environment; Magnet; patient outcomes
MDPI and ACS Style

Schlak, A.E.; Aiken, L.H.; Chittams, J.; Poghosyan, L.; McHugh, M. Leveraging the Work Environment to Minimize the Negative Impact of Nurse Burnout on Patient Outcomes. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 610. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020610

AMA Style

Schlak AE, Aiken LH, Chittams J, Poghosyan L, McHugh M. Leveraging the Work Environment to Minimize the Negative Impact of Nurse Burnout on Patient Outcomes. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(2):610. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020610

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schlak, Amelia E.; Aiken, Linda H.; Chittams, Jesse; Poghosyan, Lusine; McHugh, Matthew. 2021. "Leveraging the Work Environment to Minimize the Negative Impact of Nurse Burnout on Patient Outcomes" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 2: 610. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18020610

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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