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Article

Importance of the Working Environment for Early Retirement: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up

1
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2
Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark
3
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, 1353 Copenhagen, Denmark
4
The Danish Center for Social Science Research, 1052 Copenhagen, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9817; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189817
Received: 27 August 2021 / Accepted: 10 September 2021 / Published: 17 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prolonging Working Life among Senior Workers)
Background: This study investigates the role of physical work demands and psychosocial work factors for early retirement among older workers. Methods: Data from three Danish surveys on work environment and health among employed older workers (age 55–59) were merged with a national register containing information on labour market participation. Robust Poisson regression modelled the risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between physical and psychosocial work factors and early retirement, that is, not working after the age of 64. Results: Of the 2800 workers, 53% retired early. High physical work demands (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.19–1.48), poor overall psychosocial working conditions (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.26–1.61), and access to early retirement benefits (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.53–2.10) predicted early retirement. Subgroup analyses revealed that poor overall psychosocial working conditions were a stronger predictor for early retirement among workers with seated jobs than those with physically active jobs. Conclusions: High physical work demands and poor psychosocial working conditions are factors that can push older workers out of the labour market prematurely. Poor psychosocial working conditions seem to be a particularly strong push factor among workers with seated work. View Full-Text
Keywords: health; older worker; physical work demand; physical workload; psychosocial; retirement; statutory retirement age health; older worker; physical work demand; physical workload; psychosocial; retirement; statutory retirement age
MDPI and ACS Style

Sundstrup, E.; Thorsen, S.V.; Rugulies, R.; Larsen, M.; Thomassen, K.; Andersen, L.L. Importance of the Working Environment for Early Retirement: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9817. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189817

AMA Style

Sundstrup E, Thorsen SV, Rugulies R, Larsen M, Thomassen K, Andersen LL. Importance of the Working Environment for Early Retirement: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(18):9817. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189817

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sundstrup, Emil, Sannie V. Thorsen, Reiner Rugulies, Mona Larsen, Kristina Thomassen, and Lars L. Andersen 2021. "Importance of the Working Environment for Early Retirement: Prospective Cohort Study with Register Follow-Up" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 18: 9817. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189817

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