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Article

A Synthesis of Findings from ‘Rapid Assessments’ of Disability and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Implications for Response and Disability-Inclusive Data Collection

1
CBM Inclusion Advisory Group, Box Hill, Melbourne, VIC 3128, Australia
2
Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9701; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189701
Received: 1 August 2021 / Revised: 9 September 2021 / Accepted: 10 September 2021 / Published: 15 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Measuring Disability and Disability Inclusive Development)
Introduction: People with disabilities are disproportionately impacted by disasters, including health emergencies, and responses are not always inclusive or accessible. Disability-inclusive response and recovery efforts require rapid, contextually relevant data, but little was known about either the experience of people with disabilities in the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, or how rapid needs assessments were conducted. Methods: We reviewed the available results from rapid assessments of impacts of COVID-19 on people with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries in Asia and the Pacific. Rapid assessment methods and questions were examined to describe the current approaches and synthesise results. Results: Seventeen surveys met the inclusion criteria. The findings suggest that people with disabilities experienced less access to health, education, and social services and increased violence. The most rapid assessments were conducted by or with disabled person’s organisations (DPOs). The rapid assessment methods were varied, resulting in heterogeneous data between contexts. Efforts to standardise data collection in disability surveys are not reflected in practice. Conclusions: Persons with disabilities were disproportionately impacted by the ‘first wave’ of the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite complex implementation challenges and methodological limitations, persons with disabilities have led efforts to provide evidence to inform disability-inclusive pandemic responses. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability inclusion; inclusive development; COVID-19; disability data disability inclusion; inclusive development; COVID-19; disability data
MDPI and ACS Style

Hillgrove, T.; Blyth, J.; Kiefel-Johnson, F.; Pryor, W. A Synthesis of Findings from ‘Rapid Assessments’ of Disability and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Implications for Response and Disability-Inclusive Data Collection. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189701

AMA Style

Hillgrove T, Blyth J, Kiefel-Johnson F, Pryor W. A Synthesis of Findings from ‘Rapid Assessments’ of Disability and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Implications for Response and Disability-Inclusive Data Collection. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(18):9701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189701

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hillgrove, Tessa, Jen Blyth, Felix Kiefel-Johnson, and Wesley Pryor. 2021. "A Synthesis of Findings from ‘Rapid Assessments’ of Disability and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Implications for Response and Disability-Inclusive Data Collection" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 18: 9701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189701

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