Next Article in Journal
Organization of a Hospital Ward Aimed at Admitting Patients with SARS-CoV-2: An Economic and Epidemiological Perspective
Previous Article in Journal
Bibliometric Analysis and Research Trend Forecast of Healthy Urban Planning for 40 Years (1981–2020)
 
 
Article

Examining Wing Length–Abundance Relationships and Pyrethroid Resistance Mutations among Aedes albopictus in a Rapidly Growing Urban Area with Implications for Mosquito Surveillance and Control

1
Quantitative Disease Ecology and Conservation Lab, Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2
Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
3
Department of Geography and Earth Sciences and Center for Applied Geographic Information Science, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
4
Academy Population Health Initiative, Charlotte, NC 28223, USA
5
School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000, South Africa
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9443; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189443
Received: 23 July 2021 / Revised: 24 August 2021 / Accepted: 27 August 2021 / Published: 7 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Global Health)
Aedes albopictus is a cosmopolitan mosquito species capable of transmitting arboviruses such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. To control this and similar species, public and private entities often rely on pyrethroid insecticides. In this study, we screened Ae. albopictus collected from June to August 2017 in Mecklenburg County, a rapidly growing urban area of North Carolina, for mutations conferring pyrethroid resistance and examined spatiotemporal patterns of specimen size as measured by wing length, hypothesizing that size variation could be closely linked to local abundance, making this easily measured trait a useful surveillance proxy. The genetic screening results indicated that pyrethroid resistance alleles are not present in this population, meaning that this population is likely to be susceptible to this commonly used insecticide class. We detected no significant associations between size and abundance-related factors, indicating that wing-size is not a useful proxy for abundance, and thus not useful to surveillance in this capacity. However, mosquitoes collected in June were significantly larger than July or August, which may result from meteorological conditions, suggesting that short-term weather cues may modulate morphological traits, which could then affect local fecundity and virus transmission dynamics, as previously reported. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aedes albopictus; pyrethroid resistance; morphological traits; weather cues Aedes albopictus; pyrethroid resistance; morphological traits; weather cues
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mundis, S.J.; Hamerlinck, G.; Stone, E.K.; Whiteman, A.; Delmelle, E.; Rapp, T.; Dulin, M.; Ryan, S.J. Examining Wing Length–Abundance Relationships and Pyrethroid Resistance Mutations among Aedes albopictus in a Rapidly Growing Urban Area with Implications for Mosquito Surveillance and Control. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9443. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189443

AMA Style

Mundis SJ, Hamerlinck G, Stone EK, Whiteman A, Delmelle E, Rapp T, Dulin M, Ryan SJ. Examining Wing Length–Abundance Relationships and Pyrethroid Resistance Mutations among Aedes albopictus in a Rapidly Growing Urban Area with Implications for Mosquito Surveillance and Control. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(18):9443. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189443

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mundis, Stephanie J., Gabriela Hamerlinck, Emily K. Stone, Ari Whiteman, Eric Delmelle, Tyler Rapp, Michael Dulin, and Sadie J. Ryan. 2021. "Examining Wing Length–Abundance Relationships and Pyrethroid Resistance Mutations among Aedes albopictus in a Rapidly Growing Urban Area with Implications for Mosquito Surveillance and Control" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 18: 9443. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189443

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop