Next Article in Journal
Supply Chain Power and Corporate Environmental Responsibility: Mediation Effects Based on Business Performance
Next Article in Special Issue
Effects of the Resilience of Nurses in Long-Term Care Hospitals during on Job Stress COVID-19 Pandemic: Mediating Effects of Nursing Professionalism
Previous Article in Journal
The Future Public Health Workforce in a Changing World: A Conceptual Framework for a European–Israeli Knowledge Transfer Project
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Surgical Volume in 2020 in Poland
Article

Occupational Disruptions during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their Association with Healthcare Workers’ Mental Health

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 55 Commercial Road, Prahran, VIC 3004, Australia
2
Department of Allergy, Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Central Clinical School, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
3
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3083, Australia
4
School of Medicine and Healthcare Management, Caucasus University, Tbilisi 0102, Georgia
5
Department of Psychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan St, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
6
Centre for Health Policy, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
7
College of Health and Biomedicine, Victoria University, Footscray, Melbourne, VIC 3011, Australia
8
Division of Critical Care and Investigative Services, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, VIC 3050, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Thomas Volken and Annina Zysset
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9263; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179263
Received: 14 July 2021 / Revised: 23 August 2021 / Accepted: 24 August 2021 / Published: 2 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 Pandemics: Impact on Health Care and Health Care Professions)
Background: The COVID-19 crisis has caused prolonged and extreme demands on healthcare services. This study investigates the types and prevalence of occupational disruptions, and associated symptoms of mental illness, among Australian frontline healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A national cross-sectional online survey was conducted between 27 August and 23 October 2020. Frontline healthcare workers were invited to participate via dissemination from major health organisations, professional associations or colleges, universities, government contacts, and national media. Data were collected on demographics, home and work situations, and validated scales of anxiety, depression, PTSD, and burnout. Results: Complete responses were received from 7846 healthcare workers (82.4%). Most respondents were female (80.9%) and resided in the Australian state of Victoria (85.2%). Changes to working conditions were common, with 48.5% reporting altered paid or unpaid hours, and many redeployed (16.8%) or changing work roles (27.3%). Nearly a third (30.8%) had experienced a reduction in household income during the pandemic. Symptoms of mental illness were common, being present in 62.1% of participants. Many respondents felt well supported by their workplaces (68.3%) and believed that workplace communication was timely and useful (74.4%). Participants who felt well supported by their organisation had approximately half the risk of experiencing moderate to severe anxiety, depression, burnout, and PTSD. Half (50.4%) of respondents indicated a need for additional training in using personal protective equipment and/or caring for patients with COVID-19. Conclusions: Occupational disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic occurred commonly in health organisations and were associated with worse mental health outcomes in the Australian health workforce. Feeling well supported was associated with significantly fewer adverse mental health outcomes. Crisis preparedness focusing on the provision of timely and useful communication and support is essential in current and future crises. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; healthcare services; mental health; leadership; communication COVID-19; healthcare services; mental health; leadership; communication
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Smallwood, N.; Pascoe, A.; Karimi, L.; Bismark, M.; Willis, K. Occupational Disruptions during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their Association with Healthcare Workers’ Mental Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9263. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179263

AMA Style

Smallwood N, Pascoe A, Karimi L, Bismark M, Willis K. Occupational Disruptions during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their Association with Healthcare Workers’ Mental Health. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(17):9263. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179263

Chicago/Turabian Style

Smallwood, Natasha, Amy Pascoe, Leila Karimi, Marie Bismark, and Karen Willis. 2021. "Occupational Disruptions during the COVID-19 Pandemic and Their Association with Healthcare Workers’ Mental Health" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 17: 9263. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179263

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop