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Article

Assessment of the Reach, Usability, and Perceived Impact of “Talking Is Power”: A Parental Sexual Health Text-Messaging Service and Web-Based Resource to Empower Sensitive Conversations with American Indian and Alaska Native Teens

1
Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2
Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, Portland, OR 97201, USA
3
School of Public Health, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
4
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA
5
Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Oscar Fernando García
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9126; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179126
Received: 22 June 2021 / Revised: 19 August 2021 / Accepted: 20 August 2021 / Published: 30 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Parenting in the Digital Society and Healthy Development)
Background: Early sexual debut among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents has been associated with an increased risk of teenage pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections, along with an increased risk of having multiple lifetime sexual partners, and engaging in greater frequency of sex, substance abuse, and lack of condom use. A major protective factor against early sexual debut among AI/AN youth is the familial system. Interventions aiming to improve parent–child communication and parental warmth toward adolescent sexual health topics were reported to contribute to positive youth sexual health outcomes, specifically among minority youth. Healthy Native Youth thus developed the Talking is Power text-messaging service to guide parents and caring adults on how to initiate sensitive topics with youth and how to support them in making informed decisions regarding sex and healthy relationships. Methods: Descriptive statistics were used to demonstrate website analytics and reach per views and time spent on each page, and for displaying participants’ responses to the questions on the usability of the Talking is Power text-messaging series. To assess the perceived impact of the series, the differences in mean percentage scores of the question assessing parental comfort in engaging in sexual health topics with youth between pre- and post-intervention were calculated using two-sample t-tests of equal variances. Descriptive content analysis was adopted to highlight emerging themes from open-ended items. Results: When looking at reach, 862 entrances were recorded during the specified time period (5.8% of total entrances to HNY website), while the bounce rate was set at 73.1% (22.6% greater than the industry average), and the exit rate was 54.3% (15.2% greater than the industry average). Series usability was highly ranked on the 5-Likert scale in terms of signing up for a similar series on a different topic, quality of images, texts, and links, relating to prompts, and change in sparking sensitive conversations with youth. High likelihood of recommending the series to a friend or colleague was also reported by participants (0–10). No significant difference in parental comfort levels was reported (p = 0.78 > 0.05). Main themes provided suggestions for improving the series mode of delivery, while others included positive feedback about the material, with the possibility of expanding the series to other adolescent health topics. Conclusion: Lessons learned during the design, dissemination, and evaluation of the resource’s usability, reach, and perceived impact may be of interest to other Indigenous communities who are in the process of adapting and/or implementing similar approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: AI/AN youth; AI/AN parents; sexual health; parent-child communication; text message service; informed decision-making AI/AN youth; AI/AN parents; sexual health; parent-child communication; text message service; informed decision-making
MDPI and ACS Style

Sacca, L.; Craig Rushing, S.; Markham, C.; Shegog, R.; Peskin, M.; Hernandez, B.; Gaston, A.; Singer, M.; Trevino, N.; Correa, C.C.; Jessen, C.; Williamson, J.; Thomas, J. Assessment of the Reach, Usability, and Perceived Impact of “Talking Is Power”: A Parental Sexual Health Text-Messaging Service and Web-Based Resource to Empower Sensitive Conversations with American Indian and Alaska Native Teens. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9126. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179126

AMA Style

Sacca L, Craig Rushing S, Markham C, Shegog R, Peskin M, Hernandez B, Gaston A, Singer M, Trevino N, Correa CC, Jessen C, Williamson J, Thomas J. Assessment of the Reach, Usability, and Perceived Impact of “Talking Is Power”: A Parental Sexual Health Text-Messaging Service and Web-Based Resource to Empower Sensitive Conversations with American Indian and Alaska Native Teens. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(17):9126. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179126

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sacca, Lea, Stephanie Craig Rushing, Christine Markham, Ross Shegog, Melissa Peskin, Belinda Hernandez, Amanda Gaston, Michelle Singer, Nicole Trevino, Chrystial C. Correa, Cornelia Jessen, Jennifer Williamson, and Jerri Thomas. 2021. "Assessment of the Reach, Usability, and Perceived Impact of “Talking Is Power”: A Parental Sexual Health Text-Messaging Service and Web-Based Resource to Empower Sensitive Conversations with American Indian and Alaska Native Teens" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 17: 9126. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179126

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