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Article

Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer: Community Awareness, Knowledge and Beliefs of Middle Eastern Migrants in Sydney, Australia

1
School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
2
Burnet Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
3
Centre for Social Research in Health, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
4
Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS), La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC 3086, Australia
5
Auburn Clinical School, School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia
6
Storr Liver Centre, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia
7
Westmead Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
The author passed away.
Academic Editor: Maria Chironna
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168534
Received: 30 June 2021 / Revised: 9 August 2021 / Accepted: 9 August 2021 / Published: 12 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liver Cancer Prevention in Chronic Viral Hepatitis: Where Are We Now?)
Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a significant global health challenge given an increasing morbidity and inadequate public health response, Migrant populations are primarily affected by CHB in industrialised countries, and while more than 7% of Australians with CHB were born in Africa or the Middle East, little is known of their awareness or knowledge of viral hepatitis and its impact. This qualitative study, using semi-structured interviews with Assyrian and Arabic community leaders and focus groups (FG) with 66 community members sought to identify hepatitis and liver cancer knowledge and awareness among local Arabic and Assyrian-speaking communities in Western Sydney. Interviews were thematically analysed, with findings framing the topics for the FGs which were analysed using a framework analysis. Themes identified across both methods included limited awareness or knowledge of viral hepatitis or liver cancer, stigma associated with both conditions, variable levels of health literacy and trust in medical practitioners, and fear that receiving “bad news” would deter people from seeking care. Preferred sources of health information were family doctors, family members, the internet and the ethnic media. The study gave valuable information for the design of an educational program and provided useful information for the planning of culturally appropriate hepatitis screening and treatment services for these communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: hepatitis B; liver cancer; qualitative research; awareness; knowledge hepatitis B; liver cancer; qualitative research; awareness; knowledge
MDPI and ACS Style

Robotin, M.C.; Wallace, J.; Gallego, G.; George, J. Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer: Community Awareness, Knowledge and Beliefs of Middle Eastern Migrants in Sydney, Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 8534. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168534

AMA Style

Robotin MC, Wallace J, Gallego G, George J. Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer: Community Awareness, Knowledge and Beliefs of Middle Eastern Migrants in Sydney, Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(16):8534. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168534

Chicago/Turabian Style

Robotin, Monica C., Jack Wallace, Gisselle Gallego, and Jacob George. 2021. "Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer: Community Awareness, Knowledge and Beliefs of Middle Eastern Migrants in Sydney, Australia" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 16: 8534. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168534

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