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Article

Boundary Objects: Engaging and Bridging Needs of People in Participatory Research by Arts-Based Methods

by 1,2,3,* and 1,2,3
1
Amsterdam University Medical Centre, VU Medical Centre, Department Ethics, Law and Medical Humanities, De Boelelaan 1089a, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Leyden Academy, Rijnsburgerweg 10, 2333 AA Leiden, The Netherlands
3
Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden University, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7903; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157903
Received: 20 June 2021 / Revised: 16 July 2021 / Accepted: 23 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
Background: Participatory health research (PHR) is a research approach in which people, including hidden populations, share lived experiences about health inequities to improve their situation through collective action. Boundary objects are produced, using arts-based methods, to be heard by stakeholders. These can bring about dialogue, connection, and involvement in a mission for social justice. This study aims to gain insight into the value and ethical issues of boundary objects that address health inequalities. A qualitative evaluation is conducted on three different boundary objects, created in different participatory studies with marginalized populations (mothers in poverty, psychiatric patients, and unemployed people). A successful boundary object evokes emotions among those who created the objects and those encountering these objects. Such objects move people and create an impulse for change. The more provocative the object, the more people feel triggered to foster change. Boundary objects may cross personal boundaries and could provoke feelings of discomfort and ignorance. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to ethics work. Boundary objects that are made by people from hidden populations may spur actions and create influence by improving the understanding of the needs of hidden populations. A dialogue about these needs is an essential step towards social justice. View Full-Text
Keywords: boundary objects; participatory health research (PHR); arts-based methods boundary objects; participatory health research (PHR); arts-based methods
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MDPI and ACS Style

Groot, B.; Abma, T. Boundary Objects: Engaging and Bridging Needs of People in Participatory Research by Arts-Based Methods. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 7903. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157903

AMA Style

Groot B, Abma T. Boundary Objects: Engaging and Bridging Needs of People in Participatory Research by Arts-Based Methods. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(15):7903. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157903

Chicago/Turabian Style

Groot, Barbara, and Tineke Abma. 2021. "Boundary Objects: Engaging and Bridging Needs of People in Participatory Research by Arts-Based Methods" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 15: 7903. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157903

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